teleonomy


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teleonomy

(ˌtiːlɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
(Biology) biology the condition of having a fundamental purpose

tel•e•on•o•my

(ˌtɛl iˈɒn ə mi, ˌti li-)
n.
Biol. the principle that the body's structures and functions serve an overall purpose, as in assuring the survival of the organism.
[1955-60; teleo- + -nomy]
tel•e•o•nom•ic (ˌtɛl i əˈnɒm ɪk, ˌti li-) adj.
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The concepts of "goal" and "whole" are etymologically related, which can be traced in terms of "teleology" and "teleonomy".
DIFFERENTIATING ANIMATE FROM INANIMATE MATTER: COMPLEXITY AND TELEONOMY
This solution to the problem of converting nucleic acid chemistry into protein chemistry may be the fundamental root of teleonomy and inherent teleology in living organisms.
Abstract: Simple mechanical systems involving feedback can easily manifest teleonomy, but it is still widely believed that there is no place for genuine teleology in metaphysical naturalism.
Biologists indeed discuss function and teleonomy, but not the purpose of organisms, much less of human life.
The only concession which they make to its disreputable past is to rename it 'teleonomy'." (9)
The French biologist Jacques Monod, in his influential book, Chance and Necessity (1971), identified three properties of living beings: teleonomy ("The transmission from generation Co generation of the invariance content characteristic of the species"); autonomous morphogenesis (a structure that develops from interactions within the object itself); and reproductive invariance (the ability of an organism to reproduce and transmit its own basic structure from one generation to the next).
Once teleology is understood as teleonomy (as opposed to Platonic or cosmic teleology), Mayr has no objections to it.
"The two best examples of teleonomy are perhaps biological evolution and human personality development," notes Mahoney (1991), because "there is an apparent directionality to both (at least in historical hindsight), yet neither can be said to be seeking a specific final form or destination" (p.
Lorenz (1986) provides the concept of teleonomy which takes from Pittendrigh (1958) to explain stepway successful changes and adaptations in living organism structures out of a teleological or mystical approach.
Take another instance, what are the teleonomy, causation and random?
It has been suggested that Aristotle's concept of orderedness and finality--a basic tenet and evidence--is best expressed by the recent term "teleonomy"; here he is close to modern biology, which circumscribes the import of orderedness.