telescreen

(redirected from Telescreens)

telescreen

(ˈtɛlɪˌskriːn)
n
a television screen
References in periodicals archive ?
Setting aside arguments about forecasting, it is indisputable that surveillance in certain locales, including in the "free" world of the West, resembles Big Brother's "telescreens" everywhere in Oceania, which undermine all possibility of personal privacy.
"Imagine now the world that awaits--a world shaped by perfect communication over any distance, between any pair, or any cluster, of'telescreens,' a world in which records can be maintained and manipulated, combined and merged, moved and processed, effortlessly and at almost no cost," wrote Peter I Iuber.
Some compared it to the always-on, always-watching telescreens in George Orwell's dystopian novel "1984." Others saw the gadget's appeal -- but not if it comes from Facebook.
For example, the use of mass media instruments such as mobile phones and television for surveillance is quite similar to that of the microphones and telescreens of Orwell's Oceania.
With devices such as telescreens allowing the government to peer into citizens' homes and their lives, "Big Brother's" ability to watch over citizens churns up discomfort.
The telescreens in '1984' are TV screens that double as security cameras monitored by the state's fearsome 'Thought Police.' Telescreens allow the state to monitor and punish dissent even at the personal level, hence the warning 'Big Brother is watching you.' Even as it propagates falsehoods, the ruling Party is interested in the truth about its subjects.
Privacy campaigners have branded the policy "outrageous" and made comparison to George Orwell's telescreens, which spied on citizens in his novel 1984.
Privacy campaigners have branded the policy "outrageous" and made comparisons to George Orwell's description of telescreens, which spied on citizens in his novel 1984.
Privacy campaigners said the technology smacked of the telescreens, in George Orwell's 1984, which spied on citizens.
(7.) George Orwell, 1984 (New York Signet Classic, 1950) (Orwell depicts a nation where the ruling government, called the Party, watches its citizens through telescreens. The Party, through its leader Big Brother, controls everything in the nation to suit its needs, including the nation's history.
But singly or in combination, the three biometrics are not the equivalent of Bentham's panopticon--a building in which the locations and movements of everyone and everything are instantly and always visible--or of Orwell's 1984--a world with two-way telescreens and hidden microphones in every home.