TelePrompTer

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Tel·e·Promp·Ter

 (tĕl′ə-prŏmp′tər)
A trademark for a device employed in television to show an actor or a speaker an enlarged line-by-line reproduction of a script, unseen by the audience.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Teleprompter

(ˈtɛlɪˌprɒmptə)
n
(Broadcasting) trademark US and Canadian an electronic television prompting device whereby a prepared script, unseen by the audience, is enlarged line by line for the speaker. equivalent in Britain (and certain other countries) Autocue
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Tel•e•Promp•Ter

(ˈtɛl əˌprɒmp tər)
Trademark.
an off-camera device that displays a magnified script speakers program.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Teleprompter - a prompter for television performers
autocue, prompter - a device that displays words for people to read
trademark - a formally registered symbol identifying the manufacturer or distributor of a product
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

teleprompter

® [ˈtelɪˌprɒmptəʳ] Nteleprompter m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Teleprompter®

[ˌtɛliˈprɒmpr] n (US)prompteur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Teleprompter®

n (esp US) → Teleprompter® m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Teleprompter

® [ˈtɛlɪˌprɒmptəʳ] n (Am) → gobbo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
However, according to researchers the following may be considered as the most popular: Telescript, NOMADS, SafeTCL, D'Agents, JavaSeal, Mole, Aglets, Lime, Messenger, JADE, Voyager, TACOMA, Grasshopper, SPRINGS, MAPNET and EtherYatri.NET [39, 50, 51].
The term "mobile agent" was introduced by Telescript, which supported mobility at the programming language level.
The ineffectualness of John's character is established elsewhere in the telescript by his responding Polonius-like to a maidservant's allusion to her "baby boy's bonny bum." "That's good," he coos; "Baby boy's bonny bum is good" (45).
In particular the overview in [69] focuses on several programming languages (Java, Objective Caml, Telescript, etc.) and their suitability in mobile code environments.
have announced they integrated Telescript 5.5 and Tele Vantage 5.0 with Calltrol's Object Telephony Server to create a single platform, integrated predictive dialer and software-based phone switch solution.
Mobile agent technology has been focus of research for many large research groups, for example, Telescript (White, 1996); AgentTCL (Gray, 1997); Aglet system (Chang & Lange, 1996); Bee-gent and Plangent (Toshiba, 2001); and Hive (Minar, 2000).
Recent interpreted programming languages, such as Java [Gosling et al., 1996], Telescript [White, 1996] and Tcl/Tk [Ousterhout, 1994] provide additional support for agent mobility.
The server system was programmed with TELESCRIPT, which is a language intended for agent-oriented mobile computing applications (White 1994).
1996], DCE [Tanenbaum 19951, Erlang [Wikstrom 1994], Java [Sun Microsystems 1996], Facile [Leth and Thomsen 1992], and Telescript (from General Magic).
may drop its PersonaLink online service carrying the company's Telescript software.
But it's Magic Cap's sister technology, Telescript, that holds the most possibilities.
Arthur Miller is no stranger to this subject; his 1965 play Incident at Vichy and the 1980 telescript Playing for Time focus on the Holocaust writ large.