teleprinter

(redirected from Teletype interface)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

tel·e·print·er

 (tĕl′ə-prĭn′tər)
n.
A teletypewriter.

teleprinter

(ˈtɛlɪˌprɪntə)
n
1. (Telecommunications) a telegraph apparatus consisting of a keyboard transmitter, which converts a typed message into coded pulses for transmission along a wire or cable, and a printing receiver, which converts incoming signals and prints out the message. US name: teletypewriter See also telex, radioteletype
2. (Telecommunications) a network of such devices, formerly used for communicating information, etc
3. (Computer Science) a similar device used for direct input/output of data into a computer at a distant location

tel•e•print•er

(ˈtɛl əˌprɪn tər)

n.
a teletypewriter.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teleprinter - a character printer connected to a telegraph that operates like a typewriterteleprinter - a character printer connected to a telegraph that operates like a typewriter
character printer, character-at-a-time printer, serial printer - a printer that prints a single character at a time
Translations
طابِعَه عَن بُعْد
dálnopis
fjernskriver
telex
fjarriti
teletaipas
teletaips
ďalekopis

teleprinter

[ˈtelɪˌprɪntəʳ] Nteletipo m

teleprinter

[ˈtɛliprɪntər] ntéléscripteur m

teleprinter

teleprinter

[ˈtɛlɪˌprɪntəʳ] ntelescrivente f

teleprinter

(ˈteliprintə) noun
telegraph system or instrument by which messages are sent out at one place, and received and printed at another.
References in periodicals archive ?
The photo caption conceded that "the needed technology will not be economically feasible for the average home." The caption concluded that "with teletype interface and the Fortran language, the computer will be easy to use." I can only imagine how human professionals 50 years from now will look back on the tools, processes, and technology in use today and have a good laugh at how primitive we were.
At one time, a terminal or teletype interface, which consisted of words that appeared one letter at time, was the only type of interface available.
GEnie, which is a much smaller service than CompuServe, has been slow to develop graphical interface software, and its teletype interface uses a menu system.