Temple of Artemis


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Temple of Artemis

n
(Placename) the large temple at Ephesus, on the W coast of Asia Minor: one of the Seven Wonders of the World
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Noun1.Temple of Artemis - a large temple at Ephesus that was said to be one of the seven wonders of the ancient world
References in periodicals archive ?
It was the seat of the Temple of Artemis (twin of Apollo).
They also visited the Temple of Artemis, built on an elevated part of the site in honor of the goddess believed to protect the city, which was at its most prosperous in the third century.
Located within day trip distance from Dalaman, the ancient town of Ephesus was once home to one of the seventh wonders of the word - the Temple of Artemis. With remains that date back to the seventh millennium BCE, this ancient city is one of the most iconic historical landmarks within the region.
From Walden Pond, where transcendentalist yearning still moves acolytes through the woods, to the site of the Temple of Artemis, where the goddess no longer lives: Erickson's travels encompass locales both familiar and idealized, finding meaning between spaces that are quiet and grand.
After a restful night's sleep - the only time we really feel the ship move is when it docks in port, we arrive in Kusadasi, Turkey, site of the ancient city of Ephesus and its Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
stone's throw away is the Temple of Artemis, the virgin
Lysimachos, a commander of Alexander's, had the settlement removed from the whereabouts of the Temple of Artemis to the location between the Mount of Panayir and the Mount of BE-lbE-l, and had a wall built around the city.
The country has nine registered locations on UNESCO's World Heritage List, which are dotted all around the country and was once home to two of the ancient wonders of the world --although neither has survived to the present day--the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus and the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus.
Of the two functioning hotels now operational, one, the 734-room Kaya Artemis, resembles the ancient Temple of Artemis from Ephesus, while the other, the 684-room Noah's Ark, is, precisely as its name implies, built in the shape of a giant ark (but with no animals in evidence).
It contains, or once contained, the Temple of Artemis, a Greek deity worshipped by the Romans as Diana the huntress.
The Turquoise Coast, or Turkish Riviera, is home to two of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus and the Mausoleum of Mausolus at Halicarnassus.
Located in Bodrum, the hotel was the first international luxury hotel brand to open its doors on the seaside town and is a stone's throw away from many areas of historical interest including two of the Seven Wonders of the World - the imposing medieval castle built by the Knights of Rhodes and the Mausoleum and Temple of Artemis. It comprises 149 rooms, 24 suites and 36 serviced residences with balconies and unparalleled views of the Aegean Sea.