tenure

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ten·ure

 (tĕn′yər, -yo͝or′)
n.
1.
a. The act, fact, manner, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation.
b. A period during which something is held.
2. The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis without periodic contract renewals: a teacher granted tenure on a faculty.

[Middle English, from Old French teneure, from tenir, to hold, from Latin tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten·u′ri·al (-yo͝or′ē-əl) adj.
ten·u′ri·al·ly adv.

tenure

(ˈtɛnjʊə; ˈtɛnjə)
n
1. the possession or holding of an office or position
2. the length of time an office, position, etc, lasts; term
3. (Education) chiefly US and Canadian the improved security status of a person after having been in the employ of the same company or institution for a specified period
4. (Education) the right to permanent employment until retirement, esp for teachers, lecturers, etc
5. (Law) property law
a. the holding or occupying of property, esp realty, in return for services rendered, etc
b. the duration of such holding or occupation
[C15: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tenitūra, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold]
tenˈurial adj
tenˈurially adv

ten•ure

(ˈtɛn yər)

n., v. -ured, -ur•ing. n.
1. the holding or possessing of anything: the tenure of an office.
2. the holding of property, esp. real property, of a superior in return for services to be rendered.
3. the period or term of holding something.
4. status granted to an employee indicating that the position or employment is permanent.
v.t.
5. to give tenure to.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French teneure < Vulgar Latin *tenitura=*tenit(us), for Latin tentus, past participle of tenēre to hold + -ura -ure]
ten•u′ri•al (-ˈyʊər i əl) adj.
ten•u′ri•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenure - the term during which some position is held
term - a limited period of time; "a prison term"; "he left school before the end of term"
presidency, presidential term, administration - the tenure of a president; "things were quiet during the Eisenhower administration"
vice-presidency, vice-presidential term - the tenure of a vice president
episcopate - the term of office of a bishop
2.tenure - the right to hold property; part of an ancient hierarchical system of holding lands
legal right - a right based in law
copyhold - a medieval form of land tenure in England; a copyhold was a parcel of land granted to a peasant by the lord of the manor in return for agricultural services
freehold - tenure by which land is held in fee simple or for life
villeinage - tenure by which a villein held land
Verb1.tenure - give life-time employment to; "She was tenured after she published her book"
academe, academia - the academic world
elevate, kick upstairs, promote, upgrade, advance, raise - give a promotion to or assign to a higher position; "John was kicked upstairs when a replacement was hired"; "Women tend not to advance in the major law firms"; "I got promoted after many years of hard work"

tenure

noun
1. occupancy, holding, occupation, residence, tenancy, possession, proprietorship Lack of security of tenure meant that many became homeless.
2. term of office, term, incumbency, period in office, time his short tenure of the Labour leadership

tenure

noun
The holding of something, such as a position:
Translations
世襲保有保有期間終身

tenure

[ˈtenjʊəʳ]
A. N
1. [of land] → posesión f, tenencia f, ocupación f; [of office] → ocupación f, ejercicio m
2. (= guaranteed employment) → puesto m asegurado, permanencia f
teacher with tenureprofesor(a) m/f de número, profesor(a) m/f numerario/a
teacher without tenureprofesor(a) m/f no numerario/a
B. CPD tenure track position (US) → puesto m con posibilidad de obtener la permanencia

tenure

[ˈtɛnjər ˈtɛnjʊər] n
(= right of occupancy) [property, land] → bail m
(= period of office) période d'occupation d'un poste
(UNIVERSITY) (= right to permanent employment) → titularisation f
to have tenure → être titulaire

tenure

n
(= holding of office)Anstellung f; (= period of office)Amtszeit f
(of property) during her tenure of the house/farmwährend sie das Haus/die Farm innehatte; laws governing land tenureLandpachtgesetze pl

tenure

[ˈtɛnjʊəʳ] n (of land) → possesso; (of office) → incarico
to have tenure (guaranteed employment) → essere di ruolo
References in periodicals archive ?
The tenure track system is a classic case of a new idea failing to get implemented.
The petitioner contended that Dr Ishtiaq became a tenure track faculty member in 2016 after the closing date for the submission of applications for appointment as vice chancellor while according to the clause 1.1(d) of the statues, a faculty member on tenure track cannot assume the responsibilities in an administrative capacity such as vice chancellor.
The petitioner contended that Dr Ishtiaq became a tenure track faculty member in the year 2016 after the closing date for the submission of applications for appointment as vice chancellor while according to the clause 1.1(d) of the statues, a faculty member on tenure track cannot assume the responsibilities in an administrative capacity such as vice chancellor.
The petitioner contended that DrIshtiaq became a tenure track faculty member in the year 2016 after the closing date for the submission of applications for appointment as vice chancellor while according to the clause 1.1(d) of the statues, a faculty member on tenure track cannot assume the responsibilities in an administrative capacity such as vice chancellor.
KARACHI -- The faculty members of University of Karachi who are working under Tenure Track System (TTS) will now get their salaries on monthly basis.
Over the 11 years included in our study, five advertisements expressed an intention to appoint candidates to the tenure track without a doctorate.
I had just left my home in Brooklynkicking and screamingfor a new life on the tenure track, with a mortgage, a lawn, and an adult sized future before me.
Traditionally, professorial faculty were hired on the tenure track; after a probationary period of six successful years, they were tenured, which ensured lifelong employment.
HOW THE UNIVERSITY BREAKS DOWN[br][br]THE CONTRACT NONRENEWAL NUMBERS The College of Arts and Sciences employs a total of 881 faculty members: 455 tenure track faculty (TTF), 259 non-tenure track faculty (NTTF), 138 visiting/adjunct faculty and 29 retired faculty.
Finally, in Putting Legal Writing on the Tenure Track: One School's Experience, Catherine Christopher describes how Texas Tech University School of Law transitioned to tenure-track status for legal writing professors.
The campus CBL office sent an e-mail invitation to all faculty members (full-time, part-time, tenured/ tenure track, and contingent) who taught in the previous academic year.
After five years on the tenure track at Fitchburg State College (MA), for example, I ended up with a terminated contract and an arbitration settlement of one year's salary (see http://theamericandissident.org/orgs/fitchburg state university.html).