shipworm

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ship·worm

 (shĭp′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various wormlike marine bivalve mollusks of the family Teredinidae, especially Teredo navalis, that have rudimentary shells with which they bore into wood, often doing extensive damage to ships and wharves. Also called teredo.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shipworm

(ˈʃɪpˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any wormlike marine bivalve mollusc of the genus Teredo and related genera and family Teredinidae. They bore into wooden piers, ships, etc, by means of drill-like shell valves. See also piddock
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ship•worm

(ˈʃɪpˌwɜrm)

n.
any of various wormlike marine bivalve mollusks of the family Teredinidae, that burrow into the timbers of ships, wharves, etc.
[1770–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shipworm - wormlike marine bivalve that bores into wooden piers and ships by means of drill-like shellsshipworm - wormlike marine bivalve that bores into wooden piers and ships by means of drill-like shells
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
teredo - typical shipworm
Bankia setaceae, giant northwest shipworm - giant shipworm of the Pacific coast of North America
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As with any wood hull used in tropical waters, a skin coat of fiberglass would be necessary to guard against water intrusion as well as against the destructive Teredo navalis (shipworm.) Since this boat would not live in the water full time, worms would be less of an issue, but it was important to add glass to build a super fair surface for the finished appearance and paint.
In the case of post-larval Teredo navalis, for example, orienting the specimens in a manner similar to that described previously was impossible because points along the post-larval shell margin do not lie in a single plane.
As industry explores deeper sea depths, this affects the design and material selection of cables, with challenges such as UV stability, marine growth, microbial attack and even the burrowing Teredo Navalis Shipworm to be addressed.
In 1731, perhaps the most famous instance of marine woodborer damage took place when the shipworm, Teredo navalis, devastated Netherlands wooden seawalls, only one year after its first recorded appearance.