term limit

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term limit

n. often term limits
A provision, as in a state constitution or city charter, that restricts the number of terms an elected or appointed official may serve.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I've lived in states with term limits: When politicians are term-limited out, they simply seek another office.
White was term-limited out of office after three two-year terms as Mayor of Houston.
But after the initial crop of new legislators was term-limited out, guess what happened?
We shouldn't be lured into the web these currently term-limited legislators are weaving for their personal benefit.
Oregon's Supreme Court struck the limits in 2002 after some term-limited lawmakers challenged the restrictions on the grounds that voters had been asked to amend the Constitution multiple times through a single vote - limiting the terms of lawmakers while also restricting how long the state's members of Congress and statewide officeholders could serve.
By inhibiting the experience levels of members, their leaders and committee chairs, term-limited legislatures have lost a key element of organizational capacity.
The study also found that legislatures in term-limited states are less able to compromise or build consensus.
Several studies in California and elsewhere have found that term-limited legislators make far fewer changes in governors' proposed budgets than their predecessors did.
Competition was enhanced during the 1998 election due to the large number of vacated term-limited seats, yet in 2000 competition levels returned to normal.
Contrary to the wishes of term-limit proponents, research has demonstrated that most politicians in term-limited states are just as ambitious and interested in continuing their political career as they were prior to term limits.
Charles Canady: I can't point to anything that I did specifically because I knew I was term-limited.
Tothero of Michigan State University studied the voting habits of term-limited members in the Michigan legislature, and found that their attendance decreased at a "statistically significant rate" in their last year of service.