Teton


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Te·ton

or Te·ton Sioux  (tē′tŏn′)
n. pl. Teton or Te·tons or Teton Sioux
See Lakota.

La•ko•ta

or La•kho•ta

(ləkˈoʊtə)

n., pl. -tas, (esp. collectively) -ta.
1. a member of a Plains Indian people, the westernmost branch of the Dakota.
2. the dialect of Dakota spoken by the Lakotas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Teton - a member of the large western branch of Sioux people which was made up of several groups that lived on the plains
Brule - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Hunkpapa - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux and who formerly lived in the western Dakotas; they were prominent in resisting the white encroachment into the northern Great Plains
Miniconju - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Ogalala, Oglala - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux and who formerly inhabited the Black Hills of western South Dakota
Sihasapa - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Siouan, Sioux - a member of a group of North American Indian peoples who spoke a Siouan language and who ranged from Lake Michigan to the Rocky Mountains
Two Kettle - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
References in classic literature ?
Would a Teton warrior make his wife greater than himself?
exclaimed the Teton warrior, in a voice so stern that it startled even his red auditors.
Thus prepared at all points, and ready for his desperate undertaking, the Teton gave the signal to proceed.
In the mean time the Teton warriors had not been idle.
Here the Teton paused long and warily to make his observations, before he ventured further.
The valley called Pierre's Hole is about thirty miles in length and fifteen in width, bounded to the west and south by low and broken ridges, and overlooked to the east by three lofty mountains, called the three Tetons, which domineer as landmarks over a vast extent of country.
It was just five days after the battle of the swamp that these seven companions were making their way through Jackson's Hole, a valley not far from the three Tetons, when, as they were descending a hill, a party of Blackfeet that lay in ambush started up with terrific yells.
They reported that certain bands of the Sioux Tetons, who inhabited a region many leagues further up the Missouri, were near at hand, awaiting the approach of the party, with the avowed intention of opposing their progress.
The Sioux Tetons were at that time a sort of pirates of the Missouri, who considered the well freighted bark of the American trader fair game.
If Crooks and M'Lellan had been exasperated by the insolent conduct of the Sioux Tetons, and the loss which it had occasioned, those freebooters had been no less indignant at being outwitted by the white men, and disappointed of their anticipated gains, and it was apprehended they would be particularly hostile against the present expedition, when they should learn that these gentlemen were engaged in it.
Accordingly, on the 15th of May he departed from the village of the Omahas, and set forward towards the country of the formidable Sioux Tetons.
In fact he had totally forgotten the Sioux Tetons, and all the other perils of the country, when, about the middle of the afternoon, as he stood near the river bank, and was looking out for the boat, he suddenly felt a hand laid on his shoulder.