Teutonic Knights


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Teutonic Knights

A religious and military order 1190–1525 establishing a feudal state covering Prussia and the eastern Baltic.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in classic literature ?
In the long lists by the Garonne on the landward side of the northern gate there had been many a strange combat, when the Teutonic knight, fresh from the conquest of the Prussian heathen, ran a course against the knight of Calatrava, hardened by continual struggle against the Moors, or cavaliers from Portugal broke a lance with Scandinavian warriors from the further shore of the great Northern Ocean.
The Professor charged up and down the green aisles like a stout Teutonic knight, with a pole for a lance, leading on the boys, who made a hook and ladder company of themselves, and performed wonders in the way of ground and lofty tumbling.
Who knew the former Ibrox boss was so interested in "the role of the Teutonic Knights in the 13th century and, indeed, the contribution, culturally, of Immanuel Kant"?
The city was founded by Teutonic knights in the 13th century.
IT HAPPENED ON THIS DAY 1362: The Teutonic Knights captured Kaunas Castle after a month-long siege - a significant breakthrough in their decades-long crusade against the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, which was then the last pagan country in Europe.
However, during the crusades in the 12th and 13th centuries, the Baltic became an important source of income for the Teutonic Knights , who were granted control of the amber-producing region.
Ironically, their Muslim ancestors were invited to the Baltic to fight religiously-intolerant Christian Teutonic Knights.
The situation changed in 1226, when the Prince of Masuria, Konrad, summoned the Teutonic Knights to help him in his fight against the Old Prussians.
Designed by Bruno Schmitz, this ' Volkerschlachtdenkmal', built of granite and sandstone, 299 feet high, with colossal figures of Teutonic knights grouped around the strange dome and militaristic sculpture inside, is architecturally imaginative, megalomaniac and utterly brutal.
And, as he relates the plot of Nevsky, he writes of the Teutonic knights perishing in frozen Lake Chudskoye (p.