Thanatos


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Than·a·tos

 (thăn′ə-tōs′)
n.
1. Death as a personification or as a philosophical notion.

[Greek.]

than′a·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

Thanatos

(ˈθænəˌtɒs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the Greek personification of death: son of Nyx, goddess of night. Roman counterpart: Mors
2. (Psychoanalysis) the name chosen by Freud to represent a universal death instinct. Compare Eros2
Thanatotic adj

Than•a•tos

(ˈθæn əˌtɒs, -toʊs)

n.
1. (among the ancient Greeks) a personification of death.
2. Psychoanal. (usu. l.c.) the death instinct, esp. as expressed in violent aggression.
Than`a•tot′ic (-ˈtɒt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thanatos - (Greek mythology) the Greek personification of death; son of Nyx
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.Thanatos - (psychoanalysis) an unconscious urge to die
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
impulse, urge - an instinctive motive; "profound religious impulses"
Translations
Танатос
Tànatos
Thanatos
Thanatos
Thanatos
Tánatos
Thanatos
תנטוס
Tanatos
Thanatosz
Tanato
タナトス
Tanatas
Thanatos
Thanatos
Tanatos
Tânatos
Thanatos
Tanatos
Tanatos
Thanatos
ทานาทอส
Thanatos
Танатос
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on Freud's account of eros and thanatos in Beyond the Pleasure Principle to describe the desires that propel narrative toward both continuation and the stasis of ending, Brooks notes how narrative "claim[s] overt authority for its origin, for a 'primal scene' from which .
26) Because Handel's 'Largo' is most often heard at weddings and funerals, Mulleady and Gilchrist's use of it emphasises their conflation of eros and thanatos, as well as their religious hypocrisy, and its final line, 'We are sterilized', rejects the joyful sexuality of the others, even the prostitutes and homosexuals, and allies them firmly with the forces of death.
A matrixial Thanatos is awakened, while in fact she is longing not to death but to get into that state of non-life out of which a new life will come, in need for a symbolization of the metramorphic strings and borderlinks, and for recognition of the crossed inscriptions of joy and of both trauma and joy.
In our postmodern climate, the mythological figures of Eros and Thanatos are still effectively operating on cultural basis.
Thanatos refers to the drive in the (human) creature to forsake its specific and afflicted life in favour of a return to the indeterminate, the inanimate, and the pre-organic.
This duality of Eros and Thanatos is presented here as 'the eternal conflict at the centre of human civilisation'.
Walter Percy's The Thanatos Syndrome (1986) is the next thought experiment Swirski unpacks.
Lancelot, and The Thanatos Syndrome is well known and has been
It derived from the classical Greek notion of the world as strung between the struggle for supremacy between Eros (Life) and Thanatos (Death).
So is the present writer, who sees them as the worshippers of Thanatos, and resorts not to euphemism in order not to hurt the terrorists' feelings and to offer support to the linguistic acrobatics of twisted thinking.
The Children of Night" analyzes the text in regard to mythic Time and such figures as Morpheus, Thanatos, and Hypnos.
thanatos - have resonated across American popular culture at least since "The Last of the Mohicans.