dark tourism

(redirected from Thanatourism)

dark tourism

n
tourism to sites associated with tragedies, disasters, and death
References in periodicals archive ?
(1996) "Guided by the dark: From thanatopsis to thanatourism".
Thanatourism: Witnessing difficult pasts, Tourist Studies, 11, 55-72.
Thanatourism or peace tourism: Perceived value at a North Korean resort from an indigenous perspective.
Dark tourism is also known in academia as Thanatourism, which derives from the ancient Greek word thanatos, or the personification of death.
Here are four perspectives: (1) being at a location where you relive in memory a major human tragedy you witnessed or experienced; (2) viewing a contextualized landscape which informs you of a major human tragedy that occurred; (3) entering a foreboding dark tourism site and experiencing thanatourism (tourism related to sites associated with death or suffering) in a location of mass murder; and (4) the liquid hush of the reflective pools that moves you to contemplate an absence, a sense of loss, and emptiness in the tradition of the Ryoanji Zen Buddhist rock garden in Kyoto, Japan (http://www.ryoanji.jp).
His brochures now advertised nine-day bus tours to battlefields and other sites of human carnage, a "thanatourism" combining three meals a day and first-class hotels with real or symbolic encounters with death.
(9) John Lennon and Malcolm Foley, Dark Tourism: the Attraction of Death and Disaster (London: Continuum, 2000); Valene Smith, "War and Tourism: an American Ethnography," Annals of Tourism Research 25 (1998): 202-227; Anthony Seaton, "From Thanatopsis to Thanatourism: Guided by the Dark," Journal of International Heritage Studies 2 (1996): 234-244.
But a Welsh PhD student is researching why an increasing number of people are taking part in 'dark tourism' - or thanatourism, as it is academically known.
"Guided by the Dark: From Thanatopsis to Thanatourism." International Journal of Heritage Studies, 2 (4): 234-44.
Esta practica turistica ha recibido otras denominaciones en la literatura como "thanatourism", "morbid tourism", "disaster tourism", "grief tourism", "black spot tourism" y "phoenix tourism" (Stone, 2006).