Acts of the Apostles

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Acts of the Apostles

 (ăkts)
pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)
See Table at Bible.

Acts of the Apostles

n
(Bible) the fifth book of the New Testament, describing the development of the early Church from Christ's ascension into heaven to Paul's sojourn at Rome. Often shortened to: Acts

Acts′ of the Apos′tles


n.
a book of the New Testament. Also called Acts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Acts of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at RomeActs of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at Rome
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
Translations
Apostelgeschichte
Apostolien teot

Acts of the Apostles

n (Bible) the Acts of the Apostlesgli Atti degli Apostoli
References in periodicals archive ?
Half of the Acts of the Apostles were about his life and works.
As an experiment, Kucicki read the narrative of the Acts of the Apostles without the long speeches, then read the speeches separately, and realized that the two gave meaning to and took meaning from the other.
The Acts of the Apostles shows us multiple ways in which the early Christian community took Jesus' trust and call to mission to heart.
After breakfast, I picked up the Bible and went over the four Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.
The Acts of the Apostles offers some perspective on the development of the early Christian community in the decades following Christ's crucifixion and resurrection.
From Paul's letters and the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 8 traces the journeys of the collection and Paul from Greece and Asia Minor to Jerusalem, where it is delivered successfully, only to have Paul snared in troubles that bring him finally to Rome.
He joined the church at Jerusalem shortly after the Crucifixion and is first mentioned in the book of The Acts of The Apostles.
Smith, "We-Passages in Acts as Mission Narrative" (171-188) tackles one of the most hotly debated issues in the New Testament: the passages narrated in first person plural in the Acts of the Apostles.
Fie stresses that the "good men and good women" of southern France strove to live in accordance with principles they found in the Acts of the Apostles and the Gospels, thus living in imitation of Christ.
No parts of the New Testament treat the topics of wealth, proper use of possessions, and the perils of excessive attachment to riches as frequently as Luke's Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles.
Referring to Chapter IV of the Acts of the Apostles, Benedict noted that early Christians reacted to persecution with communal prayer.
Very simply, in the words of this morning's reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we are told that 'God raised Jesus to life'.