Aeneid

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Aeneid

(ɪˈniːɪd)
n
(Poetry) an epic poem in Latin by Virgil relating the experiences of Aeneas after the fall of Troy, written chiefly to provide an illustrious historical background for Rome

Ae•ne•id

(ɪˈni ɪd)

n.
a Latin epic poem by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
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Noun1.Aeneid - an epic in Latin by Virgil; tells the adventures of Aeneas after the Trojan War; provides an illustrious historical background for the Roman Empire
Translations

Aeneid

[ˈiːnɪɪd] NEneida f

Aeneid

nÄneide f
References in classic literature ?
who in his book called the Aeneid told of the wanderings and adventures of Aeneas, and part of this poem Surrey translated into English.
The Virgilian model (1) of the Aeneid which Dante privileged in the Convivio no longer appears plausible.
Most Americans, for example, carry a Latin quotation from the Aeneid with them whenever they leave home.
He includes a detailed introduction to the historical and literary context of the Aeneid and explains in detail the metre and its use.
Also available in an abridged version, The Aeneid the unabridged audiobook rendition of the masterpiece by Rome's greatest poet, Virgil.
The collection groups pastoral and georgic under one rubric (the first section) and the Aeneid is in its own (second) section.
Discussion Questions encourage careful reading of and thoughtful reflection on the text, while Connections to the Aeneid questions prompt students who are familiar with Vergil's epic to explore the relationship of the Thebaid to its literary predecessor.
His treatment of the Aeneid is therefore fraught with fama, which affects his interpretation of collective memory and fictive knowledge.
Finally, Heaney explicitly establishes reception--his appropriation of the Aeneid Book Six, all the way from his purchasing of the text to his making it part of himself--as a theme in all three Virgilian poems, "Album," "The Riverbank Field" and "Route 110.
In the catalogue of the Italic allies of Turnus, in Book VII of the Aeneid, the third place is occupied by the warriors coming from Tibur (after those commanded by Mezentius and by Aventinus).
whatever reputation hunting may have in Roman culture at large, in the Aeneid it turns out to be an ominous motif' (Lyne 1987:198)
For ex ample, Smith notes that the first letter of each word of the opening of the Aeneid, arma virumque cano, forms an acronym of Livy's Ab Vrbe Condita (105), identifying the story as a foundation myth.

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