Red Army Faction

(redirected from The Baader-Meinhof Gang)
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Red Army Faction

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for the Baader-Meinhof Gang
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Red Army Faction - a Marxist and Maoist terrorist organization in Germany; a network of underground guerillas who committed acts of violence in the service of the class struggle; a successor to the Baader-Meinhof Gang; became one of Europe's most feared terrorist groups; disbanded in 1998
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As well as Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia, Western European far-left militant groups like the Baader-Meinhof Gang took inspiration from Maoism as they attacked the political establishment.
Set in a divided Berlin, the story takes place against the backdrop of the October 1977 hijacking of Lufthansa flight 181 by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a group that sought the release of members of the Red Army Faction (aka the Baader-Meinhof Gang).
Critics of radical chic feminized the notion with the (admittedly clever) label "Prada Meinhof"--a play on the alternative appellation for RAF's first generation: the Baader-Meinhof Gang. (Andreas Baader, together with Meinhof and Ensslin, led the group until their capture, convictions, and prison suicides in the mid-to-late 1970s.) All this, despite the fact that women probably made up only about one-third of West Germany's far Left, according to Charity Scribner's After the Red Army Faction.
1975: A stand-off at the West German embassy in Stockholm ends in violence as the Baader-Meinhof gang blows up the building.
Former member of the Red Army Faction, known in its early days as the Baader-Meinhof gang Christof Wackernagel will be on a panel of experts speaking at the debate.
Five years later, he supported Special Branch during the arrest of Astrid Proll, a fugitive member of the Baader-Meinhof gang of German revolutionaries.
On the one hand: marriage, a PhD, going to work in Uganda, children, and a great job; on the other: widespread social and industrial strife, three-day weeks, unburied bodies, nuclear superpower tensions, the Red Brigades and the Baader-Meinhof Gang, wars everywhere, and famine, dreadful fashions, digital watches, dubious music, instant mashed potato, and the emergence of global concerns about the environment.
They demanded that Israel release 234 Palestinian prisoners and Germany release the two founding members of the Baader-Meinhof Gang.
RAF, also called the Baader-Meinhof gang, waged a violent terrorist campaign against the West German state and especially U.S.
Their successors in our own time were the German and Italian left-wing terrorists of the last 30 years of the 20th century: Germany's Revolutionary Cells and Red Army Fraction (including the Baader-Meinhof gang), and Italy's Red Brigades, who were supplied with Czech explosives and weapons by the PLO.
Indeed, the notion of a "war on terror" in reply was misguided in part because it allowed people to think that Al-Qaeda was just another terrorist group like the IRA, the Baader-Meinhof Gang, or the Red Brigades.
Also vying for the festival's Golden Bear top prize will be "Our Grand Despair" from Turkey, Israeli-British drama "Lipstikka" set in London and Jerusalem, and "If Not Us, Who?" about the origins of the Baader-Meinhof Gang starring up-and-coming German actor August Diehl ("Salt").