The Cape


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
the Cape of Good Hope, in the general sense of the southern extremity of Africa. Also used of Cape Horn, and, in New England, of Cape Cod.

See also: Cape

References in classic literature ?
It was somewhere near the Cape - THE Cape being, of course, the Cape of Good Hope, the Cape of Storms of its Portuguese discoverer.
The members of the Cape Pleasant Club were easygoing refugees from other and more exacting clubs, men who pottered rather than raced round the links; men, in short, who had grown tired of having to stop their game and stand aside in order to allow perspiring experts to whiz past them.
Gossett was an unpopular subject with members of the Cape Pleasant Golf Club.
He might have carried him round by the way of the Cape of Good Hope.
It was very tiring and slow work, yet I did visibly gain ground; and as we drew near the Cape of the Woods, though I saw I must infallibly miss that point, I had still made some hundred yards of easting.
The most remarkable instance I have known of an insect being caught far from the land, was that of a large grasshopper (Acrydium), which flew on board, when the Beagle was to windward of the Cape de Verd Islands, and when the nearest point of land, not directly opposed to the trade-wind, was Cape Blanco on the coast of Africa, 370 miles distant.
Jago in the Cape de Verd Islands, I remember having seen in a ravine a retired corner covered with bones of the goat; we at the time exclaimed that it was the burial ground of all the goats in the island.
The capador stepped to the side, with a twirl of the cape eluding the bull and spreading the cape on his own shoulders.
We left this island early the next morning, and soon came in sight of Cape Gardafui, so celebrated heretofore under the name of the Cape of Spices, either because great quantities were then found there, or from its neighbourhood to Arabia the Happy, even at this day famous for its fragrant products.
The Resolute plunged along rapidly toward the Cape of Good Hope, the weather continuing fine, although the sea ran heavier.
She got up to rouse herself, and slipped off her plaid and the cape of her warm dress.
Several of the natives appeared on the beach and made signs to them to row round the cape, but they thought it most prudent to return to the ship.