categorical imperative

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categorical imperative

n.
In the philosophical system of Immanuel Kant, the requirement on any moral law that it apply unconditionally and equally to all rational beings.

categorical imperative

n
(Philosophy) (in the ethics of Kant) the unconditional moral principle that one's behaviour should accord with universalizable maxims which respect persons as ends in themselves; the obligation to do one's duty for its own sake and not in pursuit of further ends. Compare hypothetical imperative

categor′ical imper′ative


n.
the rule of Immanuel Kant that one's actions should be capable of serving as the basis of universal law.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.categorical imperative - the moral principle that behavior should be determined by duty
moral principle - the principle that conduct should be moral
References in classic literature ?
Neither did Kant when he devised the Categorical Imperative. You have thrown aside a creed, but you have preserved the ethic which was based upon it.
Even authors who are very sympathetic to Kant, such as Allen Wood, have tried to downplay universalization, focusing instead on other formulations of the categorical imperative. In this paper, Bojanowski responds directly to four of the most prominent counterexamples.
The Federal Constitutional Court, relying on Kant's second formula of the categorical imperative, the end-in-itself-formula (2), describes the rights and duties that follow from Art.
Lorca, then, looks into Kant's principle of morality, the categorical imperative, to explain that when scholars find traces of moral worth in characters, they tend to ignore their personal defects (114).
Nothing, I believe, captures the essence of universalistic thinking better than coming to see that "it could be you." That is the heart of Rawls's veil of ignorance, the Golden Rule, and (in a more complicated way) the Categorical Imperative. Putting yourself in someone else's shoes goes to the core of thinking from a moral point of view.
In his work \"Groundworks for the Metaphysics of Morals\", Immanuel Kant discusses about the Categorical Imperative; a good act being like a diamond that shines on its own; it is not tethered to any rewards; it is done out of a sense of duty.
In terms of existential hermeneutics, the categorical imperative becomes a model narrative for humanity.
Imagine asking a Kantian to add just a bit of utilitarian calculation to the categorical imperative.
The chapters cover the categorical imperative and the moral law, the relationship between reason and the will, and how the "highest good" requires God, the immortality of the soul, and the freedom of the will.
In that work, Kant develops what he terms the "categorical imperative." The categorical imperative provides the rule that allows us to determine the ethics of an action.
The categorical imperative commands that our actions should have the form of moral conduct.
These universal canons of conceptualization consist of three norms of thought and conduct, which Wiredu named as the principles of non-contradiction, induction and the categorical imperative (Wiredu 1996:22).

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