categorical imperative

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categorical imperative

n.
In the philosophical system of Immanuel Kant, the requirement on any moral law that it apply unconditionally and equally to all rational beings.

categorical imperative

n
(Philosophy) (in the ethics of Kant) the unconditional moral principle that one's behaviour should accord with universalizable maxims which respect persons as ends in themselves; the obligation to do one's duty for its own sake and not in pursuit of further ends. Compare hypothetical imperative

categor′ical imper′ative


n.
the rule of Immanuel Kant that one's actions should be capable of serving as the basis of universal law.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.categorical imperative - the moral principle that behavior should be determined by duty
moral principle - the principle that conduct should be moral
References in classic literature ?
Neither did Kant when he devised the Categorical Imperative.
20) Section 2 concludes with the claim that one of the formulations of the categorical imperative, autonomy of the will, is the "supreme [oberstes] principle of morality" and the "sole [alleinige] principle of morals.
That is the heart of Rawls's veil of ignorance, the Golden Rule, and (in a more complicated way) the Categorical Imperative.
In terms of existential hermeneutics, the categorical imperative becomes a model narrative for humanity.
Imagine asking a Kantian to add just a bit of utilitarian calculation to the categorical imperative.
The chapters cover the categorical imperative and the moral law, the relationship between reason and the will, and how the "highest good" requires God, the immortality of the soul, and the freedom of the will.
The categorical imperative provides the rule that allows us to determine the ethics of an action.
The categorical imperative commands that our actions should have the form of moral conduct.
These universal canons of conceptualization consist of three norms of thought and conduct, which Wiredu named as the principles of non-contradiction, induction and the categorical imperative (Wiredu 1996:22).
In 'Dignity and the Formula of Humanity' (Chapter 6), Oliver Sensen's close readings of several key passages in Section II aim to establish that human beings are (descriptively) ends in themselves in virtue of the freedom of their wills; that we ought (normatively) to treat others as ends in themselves because the Categorical Imperative (i.
Immanuel Kant spoke about the categorical imperative.
Kant, via the categorical imperative, is holding that ontologically it exists only in the imagination and Marx is claiming it was offside.