Cherokee

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Cher·o·kee

 (chĕr′ə-kē′, chĕr′ə-kē′)
n. pl. Cherokee or Cher·o·kees
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting the southern Appalachian Mountains from the western Carolinas and eastern Tennessee to northern Georgia, with present-day populations in northeast Oklahoma and western North Carolina. The Cherokee were removed to Indian Territory in the 1830s after conflict with American settlers over rights to traditional lands.
2. The Iroquoian language of the Cherokee.

[From Cherokee tsalaki.]

Cher′o·kee′ adj.

Cherokee

(ˈtʃɛrəˌkiː; ˌtʃɛrəˈkiː)
npl -kees or -kee
1. (Peoples) a member of a Native American people formerly living in and around the Appalachian Mountains, now chiefly in Oklahoma; one of the Iroquois peoples
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Iroquoian family

Cher•o•kee

(ˈtʃɛr əˌki)

n., pl. -kees, (esp. collectively) -kee.
1. a member of an American Indian people residing orig. in the W Carolinas and E Tennessee: surviving groups live in Oklahoma and North Carolina.
2. the Iroquoian language of the Cherokee.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cherokee - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee
Iroquoian, Iroquoian language, Iroquois - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Iroquois
2.Cherokee - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living in the Appalachian Mountains but now chiefly in Oklahoma
Iroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York State; the Iroquois League were allies of the British during the American Revolution
Translations
cherokeechérokî
cherokee

Cherokee (Indian)

nTscherokese m, → Tscherokesin f
References in periodicals archive ?
The Successful Bidder s Award Will Be Published On The Cherokee Nation s Procurement Website And Their Performance Will Also Be Measured, Recorded, And Reported To The Cherokee Nation.
Across the Cherokee Nation in the spring of 1838, its farmers tilled their fields and planted rows of corn and beans in fertile Appalachian valleys as they had done for generations.
The Insight Reporting module will help the Cherokee Nation Entertainment properties improve productivity.
In November 2014, the Cherokee Nation activated its first traffic light project completed jointly with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) in Tahlequah, OK.
Enhanced with the inclusion of twelve pages of Chapter Notes; an eight page Bibliography; and a thirty-five page Index, "The Cherokee Struggle to Maintain Identity in the 17th and 18th Centuries" is an invaluable and significant work of impressive scholarship making it a critically important and strongly recommended addition to academic library Native American Studies reference collections in general, and the Cherokee Nation History supplemental studies reading lists in particular.
Cherokee Nation officials are honoring Cherokee veterans and bringing history to life through new displays at the Cherokee Nation Veterans Center.
Literacy and Intellectual Life in the Cherokee Nation, 1820-1906
Under the direction of the College's Campus Ministry, students will be spending time in the Cherokee Nation in Northeast Oklahoma, a trip made possible through an organization founded by the Sisters of Saint Anne called Vacations that Give.
of Arkansas), who is also an associate director of the Sequoia National Research Center, examines the period from 1820 to 1906, finding out about writing in early America, literacy in the Cherokee nation, the state of Cherokee nation education after removal, the Cherokee language and syllabary, the Cherokee Advocate and other Native American newspapers, four Cherokee writers, political writers and feuders, and a fragmenting consciousness in a fight club.
My parents, grandparents, they could hardly speak English," says Ross, age 58, a translation specialist for the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
Leadership Lessons from Cherokee Nation: Learn From All I Observe comes from a former principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation and provides a solid coverage of management techniques based on turning his 300,000-people nation from one in disarray to a functioning entity.
After two elections and several recounts and court decisions, the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma has installed a new principal chief for the first time in a dozen years.