creed

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Related to The Creed: The Nicene Creed, The Apostles creed

creed

 (krēd)
n.
1. A formal statement of religious belief; a confession of faith.
2. A system of belief, principles, or opinions: laws banning discrimination on the basis of race or creed; an architectural creed that demanded simple lines.

[Middle English crede, from Old English crēda, from Latin crēdō, I believe; see credo.]

creed

(kriːd)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a concise, formal statement of the essential articles of Christian belief, such as the Apostles' Creed or the Nicene Creed
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any statement or system of beliefs or principles
[Old English crēda, from Latin crēdo I believe]
ˈcreedal, ˈcredal adj

Creed

(kriːd)
n
(Biography) Frederick. 1871–1957, Canadian inventor, resident in Scotland from 1897, noted for his invention of the teleprinter, first used in 1912

creed

(krid)

n.
1. an authoritative formulated statement of the chief articles of Christian belief.
2. an accepted system of religious or other belief.
[before 1000; Middle English crede, Old English crēda < Latin crēdō I believe; see credo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creed - any system of principles or beliefscreed - any system of principles or beliefs
testament - a profession of belief; "he stated his political testament"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Athanasian Creed - a Christian profession of faith
2.creed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that groupcreed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
original sin - a sin said to be inherited by all descendants of Adam; "Adam and Eve committed the original sin when they ate the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
confession - the document that spells out the belief system of a given church (especially the Reformation churches of the 16th century)
ahimsa - a Buddhist and Hindu and especially Jainist doctrine holding that all forms of life are sacred and urging the avoidance of violence
dogma, tenet - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
ecumenicalism, ecumenicism, ecumenism - (Christianity) the doctrine of the ecumenical movement that promotes cooperation and better understanding among different religious denominations: aimed at universal Christian unity
Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, Immaculate Conception - (Christianity) the Roman Catholic dogma that God preserved the Virgin Mary from any stain of original sin from the moment she was conceived
Incarnation - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine of the union of God and man in the person of Jesus Christ
Nicene Creed - (Christianity) a formal creed summarizing Christian beliefs; first adopted in 325 and later expanded
real presence - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine that the body of Christ is actually present in the Eucharist

creed

noun belief, principles, profession (of faith), doctrine, canon, persuasion, dogma, tenet, credo, catechism, articles of faith The centre is open to all, no matter what race or creed.

creed

noun
A system of religious belief:
Translations
عَقيدَه، مَذْهَب
krédovíravyznánívyznání víry
livsopfattelseoverbevisningtro
oppiusko
crédofoicredo
apostoli hitvalláshitvallás
trúarjátning
pažiūros
kredopārliecībaticība
vyznanie viery
dinsel inançlaritikat

creed

[kriːd] N (= religion) → credo m, religión f; (= system of beliefs) → credo m
the Creed (Rel) → el Credo

Creed

[ˈkriːd] n
the Creed (in Mass)le Credo

creed

[ˈkriːd] n
(= religious belief) → croyance f
(= principles) → philosophie f

creed

n (Eccl: = prayer) → Glaubensbekenntnis nt; (as part of service, fig also) → Kredo nt, → Credo nt

creed

[kriːd] ncredo, dottrina

creed

(kriːd) noun
(a short statement of) one's (especially religious) beliefs.
References in classic literature ?
"It is the duty of a high priestess to instruct, to interpret--according to the creed that others, wiser than herself, have laid down; but there is nothing in the creed which says that she must believe.
There is no other example, no other ideal, and the chief use of Tolstoy is to enforce this fact in our age, after nineteen centuries of hopeless endeavor to substitute ceremony for character, and the creed for the life.
And that's not all--twenty years ago he would have found in that literature traces of conflict with authorities, with the creeds of the ages; he would have perceived from this conflict that there was something else; but now he comes at once upon a literature in which the old creeds do not even furnish matter for discussion, but it is stated baldly that there is nothing else--evolution, natural selection, struggle for existence--and that's all.
Die-hard fans would remember this as the line added to the creed maxim by Ezio in&nbsp;Assassin's Creed 2.
Its latest brand-new pistol is the Creed. I think it will get a huge amount of attention--and rightfully so.
In the fourth quarter of 2016, Walther introduced a new economy-priced pistol to their line, the Creed. It's essentially a rework of their former economy, model, the polymer-framed, hammer fired PPX, which had been discontinued earlier the same year.
Hazeldine also admitted returning to the Creed's home the same day and throwing a breeze block he'd picked up from a nearby house and smashing their living room window.
This year marks the 250th anniversary of the Creed brand and, to pay tribute to many of its distinguished clientele, a selection of letters is on display through December at the Creed boutique at Madison Avenue at 67th Street, in Manhattan.
From there begins the history of the Creed of the Noncommissioned Officer.
Expert theologians speak of each phase of the Apostles' Creed in historical context, with a particular note as to how each part of the Creed is relevant to daily life in the modern era.
(The title refers to the faith of the apostles expressed in the creed and not to being written by the apostles.) The Apostles'
So although most of the Anabaptists would have accepted this as part of the tradition and not debated it much, they gave the creed no dogmatic quality.