polygamy

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po·lyg·a·my

 (pə-lĭg′ə-mē)
n.
1. The condition or practice of having more than one spouse at one time.
2. Zoology A mating pattern in which a single individual mates with more than one individual of the opposite sex.

[French polygamie, from Late Latin polygamia, from Greek polugamiā : polu-, poly- + -gamiā, -gamy.]

polygamy

(pəˈlɪɡəmɪ)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the practice of having more than one wife or husband at the same time. Compare polyandry, polygyny
2. (Botany)
a. the condition of having male, female, and hermaphrodite flowers on the same plant
b. the condition of having these different types of flower on separate plants of the same species
3. (Zoology) the practice in male animals of having more than one mate during one breeding season
[C16: via French from Greek polugamia from poly- + -gamy]
poˈlygamist n
poˈlygamous, polyˈgamic adj
poˈlygamously adv

po•lyg•a•my

(pəˈlɪg ə mi)

n.
the practice or condition of having more than one spouse, esp. a wife, at one time.
po•lyg′a•mist, n.

polygamy

the condition of having more than two spouses simultaneously. — polygamist, n. — polygamous, adj.
See also: Crime
the practice or state of being married to more than one person at a time. — polygamous, adj.
See also: Marriage

polygamy

Marriage to more than one person at the same time. The most common form of polygamy is polygyny, where a man has several wives. A less common form is polyandry, where a woman has several husbands.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polygamy - having more than one spouse at a timepolygamy - having more than one spouse at a time
marriage, matrimony, spousal relationship, wedlock, union - the state of being a married couple voluntarily joined for life (or until divorce); "a long and happy marriage"; "God bless this union"
polyandry - having more than one husband at a time
polygyny - having more than one wife at a time
Translations
mnohoženstvípolygamie
moniavioisuuspolygamia
poligamija
poligámiatöbbnejűség
poligami
多婚性

polygamy

[pɒˈlɪgəmɪ] Npoligamia f

polygamy

[pəˈlɪgəmi] npolygamie f

polygamy

nPolygamie f, → Vielehe f, → Vielweiberei f

polygamy

[pɒˈlɪgəmɪ] npoligamia

polygamy

n. poligamia, práctica de poseer más de un cónyuge a la vez.
References in classic literature ?
It appears to be established, beyond any reasonable doubt, that he was killed (while he was asleep, or immediately on his waking) by being smothered with a pillow from his bed-- that the persons guilty of murdering him are the three Indians-- and that the object contemplated (and achieved) by the crime, was to obtain possession of the diamond, called the Moonstone.
The fair inference from all this is, that the stealing of the Moonstone was the motive of the crime.
"The fool's crime is the crime that is found out, and the wise man's crime is the crime that is NOT found out.
"I think that it must have been the Devil or the Bete du Bon Dieu that committed the crime."
"Carry this cat away to prison, and keep her in safe confinement until she is tried by law for the crime of murder."
"Oh," said Madame de Villefort, smiling, "are you courageous enough to sit down upon the very seat perhaps upon which the crime was committed?" Madame Danglars rose suddenly.
"Father," said Flambeau at last, "it is my duty, not my curiosity only--it is my duty to find out, if I can, who committed the crime."
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
In order to prevent this dreadful calamity they both set about inventing some plan which would throw suspicion on some one else, and at last they made up their minds that they could do no better than select a Jewish doctor who lived close by as the author of the crime. So the tailor picked up the hunchback by his head while his wife took his feet and carried him to the doctor's house.
"Monsieur the President," replied the advocate, "since the defendant has confessed the crime, I have only one word to say to these gentlemen.
"I analysed, if I remember, the psychology of a criminal before and after the crime."
When, intoxicated by the crimes he has committed so successfully, he reaches Paris, the dissolution of the republican government, which a year earlier might have ruined him, has reached its extreme limit, and his presence there now as a newcomer free from party entanglements can only serve to exalt him- and though he himself has no plan, he is quite ready for his new role.