Fabius Maximus

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Fabius Maximus

(ˈfeɪbɪəs ˈmæksɪməs)
n
(Biography) full name Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, called Cunctator (the delayer). died 203 bc, Roman general and statesman. As commander of the Roman army during the Second Punic War, he withstood Hannibal by his strategy of harassing the Carthaginians while avoiding a pitched battle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fa•bi•us Max•i•mus

(ˈfeɪ bi əs ˈmæk sə məs)
n.
(Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus) (“Cunctator”) 275–203 B.C., Roman general.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
http://www.mickeynews.comFNews/DisplayPressRelease.asp_Q_id_E_1084Copyright; see Posting of ttyRazor and The Cunctator to Slashdot,
In general, a Fabian policy is "nonsensical and dangerous," the recourse of "idle princes or effeminate republics." If the army retreats into a city; then the enemy will besiege it, and before long the Cunctator and his forces will be "reduced by the pangs of hunger to surrender." And if the commander simply puts distance between his army and the enemy, then he leaves his territory to be ravaged, something no "valiant prince" would countenance.