embankment

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em·bank·ment

 (ĕm-băngk′mənt)
n.
1. The act of embanking.
2. A mound of earth or stone built to hold back water or to support a roadway.

embankment

(ɪmˈbæŋkmənt)
n
(Civil Engineering) a man-made ridge of earth or stone that carries a road or railway or confines a waterway. See also levee1

em•bank•ment

(ɛmˈbæŋk mənt)

n.
1. a bank, mound, dike, or the like, raised to hold back water, carry a roadway, etc.
2. the action of embanking.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.embankment - a long artificial mound of stone or earthembankment - a long artificial mound of stone or earth; built to hold back water or to support a road or as protection
levee - an embankment that is built in order to prevent a river from overflowing
hill, mound - structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones; "they built small mounds to hide behind"
bulwark, rampart, wall - an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes; "they stormed the ramparts of the city"; "they blew the trumpet and the walls came tumbling down"
revetement, stone facing, revetment - a facing (usually masonry) that supports an embankment

embankment

noun bank, ridge, mound, causeway, rampart, earthwork They climbed a steep railway embankment.
Translations
جِسْرسَد، حاجِز، رَصيف
násep
dæmningskråningvold
penger
nasip
upphlaîinn kantur; flóîgarîur
堤防
krantinė
krastmala
násyp
vägbank
เขื่อน
đường đáp cao (cho xe lửa)

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] N [of path, railway] → terraplén m; [of canal, river] → dique m

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] n [road, railway] → remblai m, talus m; [river] (made of earth)berge f; (made of concrete)quai m (= dyke) → digue f

embankment

n(Ufer)böschung f; (along path, road) → Böschung f; (for railway) → Bahndamm m; (holding back water) → (Ufer)damm m, → Deich m; (= roadway beside a river)Ufer (→ straße f) nt

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] n (of path) → terrapieno; (of road, railway) → massicciata; (of canal, river) → argine m; (dyke) → diga

embankment

(imˈbӕŋkmənt) noun
a bank or ridge made eg to keep back water or to carry a railway over low-lying places etc.

embankment

جِسْر násep skråning Damm ανάχωμα terraplén penger remblai nasip terrapieno 堤防 dijk voll nabrzeże aterro насыпь vägbank เขื่อน istinat duvarı đường đáp cao (cho xe lửa)
References in classic literature ?
That is why--" Here he stopped himself, and they began to walk slowly along the Embankment, the moon fronting them.
You may come of the oldest family in Devonshire, but that's no reason why you should mind being seen alone with me on the Embankment."
He was seized with a sense of his misery; and he did not know what on earth to do: he was ashamed at having slept on the Embankment; it seemed peculiarly humiliating, and he felt his cheeks flush in the darkness.
Now and then he sat on the benches in Piccadilly and towards morning he strolled down to The Embankment. He listened to the striking of Big Ben, marking every quarter of an hour, and reckoned out how long it left till the city woke again.
As soon as it was good and dark, I shut off the current from all the fences, and then groped my way out to the embankment bordering our side of the great dynamite ditch.
As the streets that lead from the Strand to the Embankment are very narrow, it is better not to walk down them arm-in-arm.
The lamps and the plane-trees, following the line of the embankment, struck a note of dignity that is rare in English cities.
Footsteps coming down the embankment alarmed him, and he hid the bottle under his hat on the ground between his legs.
She stopped and leant her elbows against the parapet of the embankment. He did likewise.
On the night of his arrival in London, Alexander went immediately to the hotel on the Embankment at which he always stopped, and in the lobby he was accosted by an old acquaintance, Maurice Mainhall, who fell upon him with effusive cordiality and indicated a willingness to dine with him.
Before he had reached the embankments that were being thrown up, he saw, in the light of the dull autumn evening, mounted men coming toward him.
That was a gang of changars - the women who have taken all the embankments of all the Northern railways under their charge - a flat-footed, big-bosomed, strong-limbed, blue-petticoated clan of earth-carriers, hurrying north on news of a job, and wasting no time by the road.