Fourteen Points

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Fourteen Points

pl n
(Military) the principles expounded by President Wilson in 1918 as war aims of the US
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fourteen Points were the First World War aims of which country?
Mohammad Ali opposed the Nehru Report's rejection of separate electorates for Muslims, and supported the Fourteen Points of Muhammad Ali Jinnah and the League.
In 1928 he left the Indian National Congress, opposed the Nehru Report tooth and nail, supported the fourteen points of the Quaid-e-Azam and advised the Muslims to dissociate themselves from the Civil Disobedience movement of 1930.
Assessing the events in Paris, Baker wrote that "the greatest fault of this whole peace conference is the failure to take the people into our confidence"--in other words, Wilson's abrogation of the first of the Fourteen Points.
The Nehru Report, therefore, was responded as well as rejected in the Fourteen Points of Jinnah.
The Treaty of Versailles, which ended the First World War, contained little of the spirit of the Fourteen Points that had promised an equable end to the war.
President Wilson's lofty goals for the peace conference, elaborated in statements such as the Fourteen Points, mattered not only to Europeans, but also to colonial peoples hoping to undo the imperialism of the great powers.
He revealed that he was willing to accept a proviso in the pending naval legislation that if the peace conference adopted some agreement to reduce armaments (the fourth of the Fourteen Points, "national armaments would be reduced"), he could postpone building contracts pending consultation with Congress.
Later, after the Treaty of Versailles had been hammered out--and Wilson's amateurish attempt at direct diplomacy was hammered pretty severely in the process--the Germans justly complained that they had been hoodwinked into the armistice by Wilson's promise to make the Fourteen Points the basis of a postwar settlement.
On October 4th Germany sent a telegram via Switzerland requesting that the American president, Woodrow Wilson, negotiate a settlement based on the Fourteen Points speech that he had delivered to Congress on January 8th, 1918.
In practice, the Fourteen Points program can be judged a failure.