Gallup poll

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Gallup Poll

(ˈɡæləp)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a sampling by the American Institute of Public Opinion or its British counterpart of the views of a representative cross section of the population, used esp as a means of forecasting voting

Gal′lup poll`


n.
a representative sampling of public opinion or public awareness concerning a certain subject or issue.
[1935–40; after German. H. Gallup]
Translations

Gallup poll

[ˈgæləpˌpəʊl] Nsondeo m or encuesta f Gallup

Gallup poll

Gallup poll

® [ˈgæləpˌpəʊl] nsondaggio d'opinionesondaggio Doxa
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Gallup poll, published yesterday in anticipation of The Speech, 45 percent of Americans view Netanyahu favorably, as compared to 24 percent who view him unfavorablya sizable increase from 2012, when his favorability rate was 35 percent.
Obama and Clinton top the Gallup poll for the sixth consecutive year.
The Gallup poll, conducted between 12 and 19 June, was based on face-to-face interviews with 1,149 Egyptian adults aged 15 and older.
The Gallup Poll daily tracking during President Barack Obama's first 100 days in office found that while there is wide-spread support for the president from religious and non-religious Americans, Muslims gave him the very highest ratings.
For the Gallup Poll Daily tracking survey, Gallup is interviewing no fewer than 1,000 U.
And, as the Gallup poll demonstrated, successful business partnerships are mutually beneficial relationships.
The 1940 race began with Tom Dewey, who had gained national attention as a crusading district attorney, comfortably in the lead for the Republican nomination, with over 50 percent in the Gallup poll, followed by Ohio senator Robert Taft and Michigan senator Arthur Vandenberg.
The researchers of this study acknowledge the significant contribution of the Gallup Poll toward this project.
We're right back where we started,' said Frank Newport, executive editor of The Gallup Poll.
But the 52 percent in the Gallup poll shouldn't count on that.
According to the Gallup Poll, only 38 percent of Americans said Romney's speech was excellent or good, compared to 47 percent who thought 2008 Republican presidential candidate John McCain's speech was excellent or good.
The Gallup poll had indicated possible narrowing of the race earlier this week, from 57-34-4 on Oct.