Gettysburg Address

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Gettysburg Address

n
(Historical Terms) history US the speech made by President Lincoln at the dedication of the national cemetery on the Civil War battlefield at Gettysburg in Nov 1863
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Noun1.Gettysburg Address - a three-minute address by Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War at the dedication of a national cemetery on the site of the Battle of Gettysburg (November 19, 1863)Gettysburg Address - a three-minute address by Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War at the dedication of a national cemetery on the site of the Battle of Gettysburg (November 19, 1863)
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Synopsis: While it has long been determined that Abraham Lincoln's writings were influenced by the King James Bible, until now no full-length study has shown the precise ways in which the Gettysburg Address uses its specific language.
The author takes readers on a tour of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, describing its role in the Civil War and each day of the battle in 1863, the townAEs history and features today, Gettysburg National Military Park, the Gettysburg Address, the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center, the Eisenhower National Historic Site, places and people in the town, and reenactors and reenactments, ending with an interview with the new Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park, Ed Clark.
Four score and seven years ago, our Jewish forefathers brought forth, upon this continent a stationery company that provided the paper on which Abraham Lincoln's wrote the Gettysburg Address.
Once the children are convinced that Miss Z is the real deal, they receive their mission: They must take a picture of President Lincoln giving the Gettysburg Address.
In short, Peatman examines the Gettysburg Address as a study in historical memory, and, in doing so, he puts forward an argument--written in clear, jargon-free prose, and rooted in extensive primary source research and in the relevant secondary literature--that is ultimately convincing.
President Abraham Lincoln used to deliver the Gettysburg Address.
Abraham Lincoln's closing message in the Gettysburg Address -- "Government of the people, by the people, for the people'' -- was adapted from a speech in 1850 by abolitionist Theodore Parker.
Lincoln composed and delivered the Gettysburg Address in a style radically different from the great orators of his day.
In fact the Gettysburg Address was just 272 words only because Abe forgot to add the postcode.
That the Gettysburg Address achieves so much in so little space has a lot to do with what Lincoln didn't say on that November day in 1863.
By accepting the Gettysburg Address, and its concept of a single people dedicated to a proposition, we have been changed," writes historian Garry Wills.