stoicism

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sto·i·cism

 (stō′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. Indifference to pleasure or pain; impassiveness.
2. Stoicism The doctrines or philosophy of the Stoics.

stoicism

(ˈstəʊɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. indifference to pleasure and pain
2. (Philosophy) (capital) the philosophy of the Stoics

Sto•i•cism

(ˈstoʊ əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the philosophy of the Stoics.
2. (l.c.) conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, as repression of emotion and indifference to pleasure or pain.
[1620–30]

stoicism

a form of conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, especially as characterized by indifference to pain and pleasure. — stoic, n., adj.stoical, adj.
See also: Pleasure
an indifference to pleasure or pain. — stoic, n., adj. — stoical, adj.
See also: Pain
the school of philosophy founded by Zeno (of Citium), who asserted that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. — Stoic, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

stoicism

A Greek philosophy adopted by Rome stressing private rectitude and involvement in public affairs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoicism - an indifference to pleasure or pain
emotionlessness, unemotionality - absence of emotion
2.Stoicism - (philosophy) the philosophical system of the Stoics following the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Zeno
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy

stoicism

Translations

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] Nestoicismo m

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪzəm] nstoïcisme m

Stoicism

n (Philos) → Stoizismus m

stoicism

n (fig)Stoizismus m, → stoische Ruhe, Gleichmut m

stoicism

[ˈstəʊɪsɪz] nstoicismo
References in classic literature ?
Certainly the Stoics bestowed too much cost upon death, and by their great preparations, made it appear more fearful.
The transition is a keen one, I assure you, from the schoolmaster to a sailor, and requires a strong decoction of Seneca and the Stoics to enable you to grin and bear it.
In the affair of love, which, out of strict conformity with the Stoic philosophy, we shall here treat as a disease, this proneness to relapse is no less conspicuous.
To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates--see there his tenement-- Whom, well inspired, the Oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe.
With a loftier morality than that of the Epicureans, and a sterner sense of man's duties, Zeno and the Stoic philosophers prescribed suicide in certain cases to their followers.
The men, pitching forward insanely, had burst into cheerings, moblike and barbaric, but tuned in strange keys that can arouse the dullard and the stoic.
And in the shelter of the hut, La paced to and fro beside the stoic ape-man.
He knew the panic of terror which the scent of the Gomangani inspired within that savage breast, and as night drew on, hope died within his heart and in the stoic calm of the wild beast which he was, he resigned himself to meet the fate which awaited him.
Whatever the cause, I'm really into a bunch of radgies called the Stoics - I think they must have had North East blood
Philosophers from the US and Europe discuss blending as the Stoic explanation for the constitution and causation of bodies; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in PlatoAEs Phaedrus; perception in PlatoAEs tripartite soul in the Republic, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; the Stoics and the issue of peculiar qualities and their relation to the identity of a particular individual; and an alternative reading of PlatoAEs politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events (the trial of Socrates and PlatoAEs failed intervention in Sicilian politics), the Republic as reconstruction of SocratesAE defense in the Apology, and the Laws as a reconstruction of PlatoAEs idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.
Virtue ethics includes a family of theories with a rich and complex history, including ancient perspectives from the likes of Aristotle and the Stoics, as well as medieval perspectives such as that of Thomas Aquinas.
The Stoics were philosophers dedicated to the study of self-mastery, not self-abnegation.