Porte

(redirected from The Sublime Porte)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

Porte

 (pôrt)
n.
The government of the Ottoman Empire.

[French, short for la Sublime Porte, the High Gate (the main gate of the palace complex of the Ottoman sultan in Istanbul), the Porte : sublime, sublime + porte, gate (from Old French; see port3) (translation of Ottoman Turkish Bāb-ı 'ālī : Arabic bāb, gate + Persian -i, suffix connecting a noun to its qualifier + Arabic 'ālī, high).]

Porte

(pɔːt)
n
(Historical Terms) Also called: Sublime Porte the court or government of the Ottoman Empire
[C17: shortened from French Sublime Porte High Gate, rendering the Turkish title Babi Ali, the imperial gate, which was regarded as the seat of government]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Porte - the Ottoman court in ConstantinoplePorte - the Ottoman court in Constantinople
royal court, court - the sovereign and his advisers who are the governing power of a state
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, the Phil-Hellenes, bestowed with a classical education, viewed the Greeks of the Ottoman Empire as the true heirs of Ancient Greek Civilization and felt an ethical obligation to free them from the tyrannical Islamic rule of the Sublime Porte.
During the first months Egypt was under British protection, the Sublime Porte issued a firman expropriating the lands overlooking the Gulf of Aqaba from Egypt and annexing them to Palestine and Jordan, which were parts of the Ottoman Empire back then.
For example, recent discussions in the English School approach have noted the critical role of encounters between European powers and the Sublime Porte in the development of diplomatic immunities as well as the development of permanent embassies to solicit the cooperation of sultans such as those established in Constantinople by Venetian bailos, and ambassadors from France and England over the course of the 15-16th centuries.
There is certainly truth in these associations, but as likely it may well have been that the "Capitulations" of the Sublime Porte in Constantinople ceded much of that responsibility to the West centuries before and found that the majority Muslim population of the empire was not serviced by these Western institutions.
The European hegemons, Britain and France, took the place of the Sublime Porte.
The European hegemons, Britain and France, took the place of the Sublime Porte, guaranteeing this order either directly or via regional proxies.
An examination of contacts between the Sublime Porte and the Muslim Lands Below the Winds illustrates this 'new "configuration of history" 'that comes out of emerging fields of academic inquiry, such as Indian Ocean Studies, applying a research template inspired by the now classical work of Annales School historian Fernand Braudel on the maritime expanse encompassing the Mediterranean World and the Atlantic.
After the Sublime Porte refused Mensicov's conspicuous proposals and the relations between Russia and the Ottoman Empire broke off in May 1853, on 20th June 1853 the tsar and the Russian government decided to occupy the Romanian Principalities (Ciachir, 1961: 81-86), in this way trying to force the Sublime Porte to accept the proposals submitted to the sultan through Mensicov.
Ottoman Ambassador also promised to be negotiating with the Sublime Porte.
Whereas the Sublime Porte initially turned a deaf ear to Mgr Hubaysh's Lebanism, the Maronite Church used the latter to skillfully forge an alliance with France.
Operations led by Bedirhan Bey to seize the fertile lands of northern Mesopotamia were tacitly approved by the Sublime Porte.
nma Partisi) in Turkey follows an ideology with historical dimensions extending to the days of the Ottoman Empire, which ruled for hundreds of years, gathering under the authority of the Sublime Porte the various Muslim confessions (the enmity between Turkey and Iran being a different issue) as well as minorities from other religions, and peoples of various national backgrounds, the countries of which had come under the Sultan's control through military force.