cranial nerves

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cranial nerves

Twelve pairs of nerves linking the underside of the brain with parts of the head, neck, and thorax. Some feed sensations from the eyes, nose, and ears to the brain.
Translations

cra·ni·al nerves

n. nervios craneales, cada uno de los doce pares de nervios que salen de la región inferior del cerebro.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, case reports and series have noted higher rates of cranial neuropathy, such as facial palsy and paresthesia, among GBS patients with evidence of Zika virus infection, suggesting that the cranial nerves may be targeted by either virus or antibody (3,6-9).
Coverage encompasses visual fields, supranuclear and internuclear gaze pathways, nystagmus and related ocular oscillations, syndromes of the cranial nerves, cavernous sinus syndrome, the pupil, the swollen optic disc, optic atrophy, myasthenia and ocular myopathies, eyelid disorders, headache, carotid artery disease and the eye, nonorganic visual disorders, disorders of higher visual function, neurocutaneous disorders, and neuroimaging.
No patient had involvement of all of the cranial nerves except one patient with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis who presented with bilateral involvement of 7 cranial nerves III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX, and X.
The PoNS is an investigational medical device that is designed to induce neuromodulation by stimulating the cranial nerves found in the tongue.
Involvement of the peripheral nerves or the cranial nerves is a frequent finding in MIDs but often neglected by physicians.
Occipital condyles are in close relationship with the hypoglossal canal and the jugular foramen, which includes the cranial nerves IX, X, and XI (28).
Resection of a carotid body paraganglioma carries the inherent risks of injury to the cranial nerves and carotid arteries, as well excessive blood loss.
Subtle paralysis of the cranial nerves, together with a series of ophthalmologic alterations related to an increase in the intraocular venous pressure and ischaemia of the retina were frequently observed.
This book facilitates understanding of nervous system function with specific sections dealing with sensory and motor functions, functions mediated by the cranial nerves and so-called higher cortical functions.
i) the presence of unilateral palsies of the cranial nerves,
As a general rule-of-thumb, acquired palsies affecting just one of the cranial nerves, but with additional, remote (ie non-ocular) sensory and/or motor syndromic dysfunctions are indicative of damage confined to the brainstem, whereas completely isolated palsies suggest a local lesion of the affected nerve along its passage in the sub-arachnoid space, since here the nerves are widely separated and other neural tissues may not be involved.