influenza

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in·flu·en·za

 (ĭn′flo͞o-ĕn′zə)
n.
1. An acute contagious viral infection of humans, characterized by inflammation of the respiratory tract and by fever, chills, muscular pain, and prostration. Also called grippe.
2. Any of various viral infections of domestic or wild animals, generally characterized by fever and respiratory involvement.

[Italian, from Medieval Latin īnfluentia, influence (so called apparently from the belief that epidemics were due to the influence of the stars); see influence.]

in′flu·en′zal adj.

influenza

(ˌɪnflʊˈɛnzə)
n
(Pathology) a highly contagious and often epidemic viral disease characterized by fever, prostration, muscular aches and pains, and inflammation of the respiratory passages. Also called: grippe or flu
[C18: from Italian, literally: influence, hence, incursion, epidemic (first applied to influenza in 1743)]
ˌinfluˈenzal adj

in•flu•en•za

(ˌɪn fluˈɛn zə)

n.
1. an acute, commonly epidemic disease occurring in several forms, caused by numerous rapidly mutating viral strains and characterized by respiratory symptoms and general prostration.
2. any of various acute, contagious viral infections of domestic animals that affect the respiratory tract.
[1735–45; < Italian < Medieval Latin influentia influence]
in`flu•en′zal, adj.
in`flu•en′za•like`, adj.

in·flu·en·za

(ĭn′flo͞o-ĕn′zə)
A contagious disease caused by a virus that is characterized by fever, inflammation of the airways, and muscle pain. It commonly occurs in epidemics, one of which killed 20 million people between 1917 and 1919.
Word History Since ancient times, influenza has periodically swept the world. In just a few years during the early 1900s, 20 million people worldwide died from influenza, which we commonly call the flu. Until recently, people could not tell how this illness could spread so widely. Before people knew that organisms cause disease, they thought the stars influenced the spread of influenza. The name for this illness, in fact, reflects that belief. Influenza comes eventually from the Latin word influentia, meaning "influence of the stars." Today, however, the stars are no longer blamed for the flu. Modern medicine has found that inhaling certain viruses, called influenza viruses, causes the spread of this illness.

influenza

A viral infection that is much like a severe cold, but may also infect the throat and ears and can be fatal in the weak or elderly. Also called flu.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.influenza - an acute febrile highly contagious viral diseaseinfluenza - an acute febrile highly contagious viral disease
contagion, contagious disease - any disease easily transmitted by contact
Asian influenza, Asiatic flu - influenza caused by the Asian virus that was first isolated in 1957
swine flu, swine influenza - an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of swine caused by the orthomyxovirus thought to be the same virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic
respiratory disease, respiratory disorder, respiratory illness - a disease affecting the respiratory system
Translations
إنفلونزاإَنْفِلْوَنْزَاإنفلونزا، نَزْلَه
chřipka
influenza
influenssa
gripa
influenza
inflúensa, flensa
インフルエンザ
인플루엔자
gripas
gripa
gripeinfluenza
gripă
chrípka
influensa
ไข้หวัดใหญ่
gripinfluanza
bệnh cúm

influenza

[ˌɪnflʊˈenzə] Ngripe f

influenza

[ˌɪnfluˈɛnzə]
ngrippe f
modif [virus] → de la grippe; [vaccine] → contre la grippe; [epidemic] → de grippe

influenza

nGrippe f

influenza

[ˌɪnfluˈɛnzə] n (Med) → influenza

influenza

(influˈenzə) (usually abbreviated to fluor 'flu (fluː) ) noun
a type of infectious illness usually causing headache, fever, a cold etc.

influenza

إَنْفِلْوَنْزَا chřipka influenza Grippe γρίπη gripe influenssa grippe gripa influenza インフルエンザ 인플루엔자 influenza influensa grypa gripe грипп influensa ไข้หวัดใหญ่ grip bệnh cúm 流感

in·flu·en·za

n. influenza, infección viral aguda del tracto respiratorio.

influenza

n (form) gripe f, influenza (form); Asian — gripe asiática; avian — gripe or influenza aviar; seasonal — influenza or gripe estacional; swine — gripe porcina
References in classic literature ?
Then for a moment he felt the grip of them almost burn into his flesh.
He jerked his shoulder petulantly away from the grip of his questioner.
The grip of the land upon the keel of your ship, even if nothing worse comes of it than the wear and tear of tackle and the loss of time, remains in a seaman's memory an indelibly fixed taste of disaster.
The O-rings (one on top of the bushing and one under the grip screw) makes things secure and cushions the grips and the bushing.
But one question arose when I was kicking this subject around with G&A's editors: Does changing the grip size of these new and modern polymer pistols improve hit probability?
The premium version of the grip, which also charges the Joy-Con controllers, is being sold separately for $29.
With this many change outs, the grip screws and grip screw bushings can give us trouble.
8226; The grip has won many awards, including "Top PGA Product of the Year" because immediately you are able to increase your distance and reduce wayward ball flight
But if the owner of a polymer-framed pistol doesn't like the angle, size or texture of the grip and wants to make a change?
With the studs engaged, rotate the grip until the latch springs into place.
In the grip procedure of fastball, the index and middle finger tips are placed directly on the perpendicular seam of the baseball.
The design is larger in the forward edge of the grip, giving the hand more to hold in an area that doesn't create bulge when the gun is concealed.