Pilgrimage of Grace

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Pilgrimage of Grace

n
(Historical Terms) a rebellion in 1536 in N England against the Reformation and Henry VIII's government

Pilgrimage of Grace

1536 A northern English rebellion against the dissolution of the monasteries. It was savagely suppressed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Pilgrimage of Grace was a revolt against the government of which king of England?
Wilton Castle was created from a manor house by the Bulmer Family in 1330, in 1536 the estate were forfeited to the crown due to the Pilgrimage of Grace, but restored to them in 1547.
He investigates the seven times that Britain came closest to revolution, beginning with the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, then the Jack Cade rising of 1450, the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536, the English Civil War of the 1640s, the Jacobite Rising of 1745-46, the Chartist Movement of 1838-50 and ending with the General Strike of 1926.
It was also taken to the Pilgrimage of Grace, when local people protested against the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
In between are the usual suspects: Becket, the peasants revolt, the Pilgrimage of Grace, Peterloo, the Chartists, Suffragettes, the 'Angry Brigade" and Greenham Women but no English Martyrs, 'Seven Bishops' or Edwardian 'passive resisters'.
Here, Bernard objects to Ethan Shagan's representation of what motivated the people who made up the Pilgrimage of Grace.
Author of Great Harry's Navy and The Pilgrimage of Grace, Geoffrey Moorhouse investigates the vibrancy of the Benedictine monastic community at Durham and the impact of the dissolution of the monasteries, in the spirit of Eamon Duffy's study of Morebath.
As a yeoman he was not just an in-between man straddling the worlds of gentry and non-gentry alike, but was a forest man, known to produce England's best archers but closely linked to the men who carried the local government at its lowest level, independent-minded and not afraid to remonstrate against royal authority - as happened in Cade's rebellion and the Pilgrimage of Grace.
Housley concludes this study with 1536 because this year marked the Pilgrimage of Grace, the Franco-Ottoman Capitulations, the deaths of Eramus and More, and the fall of MOnster.
leader of the Pilgrimage of Grace, applied the phrase "the beauties
This continued to divide loyalties and to foster, from the Pilgrimage of Grace onwards, the threat of Catholic rebellion.
I told him of the Carthusians, and the other monks, priests, and laymen, but I forgot the largest, the most important, and the most neglected popular rising in English history, the Pilgrimage of Grace, the name given by Robert Aske, a Yorkshire lawyer practising in London, and one of its leaders.