Trail of Tears

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Trail of Tears

n.
The forcible removal of the Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Seminole nations from their traditional homelands in the East to Indian Territory, carried out by the US government mostly between 1831 and 1839. The term originated during the initial removal of the Choctaws in 1831 and is often applied in particular to the removal of the Cherokees in 1838-1839.

Trail of Tears

1838–39, the six-month journey undertaken by 14,000 Cherokee Indians who were being forcibly relocated. 4000 died on the journey.
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This government-sponsored cruelty will go down in American history with the Trail of Tears and Japanese internment camps.
"His most recent book, Jacksonland, examines the interactions between President Andrew Jackson and Cherokee Chief John Ross, which culminated in the removal of tribal members via the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory, where the Cherokee Nation established a new government in Tahlequah," said Peggy Glenn, executive director of the NSU Foundation.
This coffee-table title appeared out of nowhere, suddenly, by an author who is a Civil War historian regarding the Civil War and Native Americans; the Cherokee tribe in particular, and referencing events such as the Trail of Tears and the Civil War.
forced to traverse for days across the Trail of Tears.
But you helped us learn about the Trail of Tears chapter of our history in a very inspirational way--through the eyes of the descendants of those who experienced such inhumane removal.
Synopsis: Jesse Bushyhead was a detachment leader during the forced Indian removal on what has become known as the Trail of Tears. In this capacity, he was responsible for the safe conduct of more than 900 emigrants from Tennessee to Indian Territory in eastern Oklahoma.
Only two of these routes receive mention in the book, the AT and the Trail of Tears. A study of other profoundly important trails in the system, like the Nez Perce National Historic Trail, would have been more compelling than the author's preoccupation with scientific studies.
Despite adopting and adapting to many changes brought by European settlers, the Cherokee were forced to abandon their ancestral homes and move west on an 800-mile trek known today as the Trail of Tears. What's in a Name?
The journey became known as "The Trail of Tears" or, as a direct translation from the Cherokee Nunna daul Tsuny, "The Trail Where They Cried." The powwow is a time to commemorate the Trail of Tears and special ceremonies are held in remembrance of it.
By centering his story on the relationship (read: antagonism) between Ross and Jackson, Inskeep provides his book with a clear focus and framework, though some critics lamented his hurried treatment of the Trail of Tears, and others thought he was a bit too lenient with the rapacious Jackson.

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