Thebes

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Thebes

 (thēbz)
1. An ancient city of Upper Egypt on the Nile River in present-day central Egypt. It flourished from the mid-22nd to the 18th century bc as a royal residence and a religious center for the worship of Amun. Its archaeological remains include many splendid temples and the tomb of Tutankhamun in the nearby Valley of the Kings.
2. An ancient city of Boeotia in east-central Greece northwest of Athens. Originally a Mycenaean city, it reached the height of its power in the fourth century bc but was largely destroyed by Alexander in 336.

The′ban (thē′bən) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Thebes

(θiːbz)
n
1. (Placename) (in ancient Greece) the chief city of Boeotia, destroyed by Alexander the Great (336 bc)
2. (Placename) (in ancient Egypt) a city on the Nile: at various times capital of Upper Egypt or of the entire country
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Thebes

(θibz)

n.
1. an ancient city in S Egypt, on the Nile, on the site of the modern towns of Karnak and Luxor.
2. a city of ancient Greece, in Boeotia.
The′ban, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thebes - an ancient Egyptian city on the Nile River that flourished from the 22nd century BC to the 18th century BCThebes - an ancient Egyptian city on the Nile River that flourished from the 22nd century BC to the 18th century BC; today the archeological remains include many splendid temples and tombs
Arab Republic of Egypt, Egypt, United Arab Republic - a republic in northeastern Africa known as the United Arab Republic until 1971; site of an ancient civilization that flourished from 2600 to 30 BC
Theban - an Egyptian inhabitant of ancient Thebes
2.Thebes - an ancient Greek city in Boeotia destroyed by Alexander the Great in 336 BC
Boeotia - a district of ancient Greece to the northwest of Athens
Theban - a Greek inhabitant of ancient Thebes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Thebes

[θiːbz] NTebas f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Thebes

[θiːbz] nsgTebe f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The Lacedaemonians next governed it twenty-nine years; at a subsequent period, after the battle of Leuctra, the Thebans had their turn of domination.
The Thebans, with others of the cities, undertook to maintain the authority of the Amphictyons, and to avenge the violated god.
After the death of Epaminondas, Philip of Macedon was made captain of their soldiers by the Thebans, and after victory he took away their liberty.
Him (Amphiaraus) did the Cadmean (Theban) women with trailing robes admire when they saw face to face his eyes and well-grown frame, as he was busied about the burying of Oedipus, the man of many woes.
2-50) probably led up to an account of the Trojan (and Theban?) war, in which, according to "Works and Days" ll.
ISMENE To plant thee near the Theban land, and so Keep thee within their grasp, yet now allow Thy foot to pass beyond their boundaries.
OEDIPUS Mean they to shroud my bones in Theban dust?
I believe that Periander or Perdiccas or Xerxes or Ismenias the Theban, or some other rich and mighty man, who had a great opinion of his own power, was the first to say that justice is `doing good to your friends and harm to your enemies.'
You must go to the house of Hades and of dread Proserpine to consult the ghost of the blind Theban prophet Teiresias, whose reason is still unshaken.
As this boldness of the women can be of no use in any common occurrences, if it was ever so, it must be in war; but even here we find that the Lacedaemonian women were of the greatest disservice, as was proved at the time of the Theban invasion, when they were of no use at all, as they are in other cities, but made more disturbance than even the enemy.
The grottoes at this point, although less magnificent than the Theban sepulchres, are of higher interest, on account of affording more numerous illustrations of the private life of the Egyptians.
My means, which are certainly ample, are at your service, and if you have a scruple about spending all mine, here are strangers who will give you the use of theirs; and one of them, Simmias the Theban, has brought a large sum of money for this very purpose; and Cebes and many others are prepared to spend their money in helping you to escape.