Thebes


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Thebes

 (thēbz)
1. An ancient city of Upper Egypt on the Nile River in present-day central Egypt. It flourished from the mid-22nd to the 18th century bc as a royal residence and a religious center for the worship of Amun. Its archaeological remains include many splendid temples and the tomb of Tutankhamun in the nearby Valley of the Kings.
2. An ancient city of Boeotia in east-central Greece northwest of Athens. Originally a Mycenaean city, it reached the height of its power in the fourth century bc but was largely destroyed by Alexander in 336.

The′ban (thē′bən) adj. & n.

Thebes

(θiːbz)
n
1. (Placename) (in ancient Greece) the chief city of Boeotia, destroyed by Alexander the Great (336 bc)
2. (Placename) (in ancient Egypt) a city on the Nile: at various times capital of Upper Egypt or of the entire country

Thebes

(θibz)

n.
1. an ancient city in S Egypt, on the Nile, on the site of the modern towns of Karnak and Luxor.
2. a city of ancient Greece, in Boeotia.
The′ban, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thebes - an ancient Egyptian city on the Nile River that flourished from the 22nd century BC to the 18th century BCThebes - an ancient Egyptian city on the Nile River that flourished from the 22nd century BC to the 18th century BC; today the archeological remains include many splendid temples and tombs
Arab Republic of Egypt, Egypt, United Arab Republic - a republic in northeastern Africa known as the United Arab Republic until 1971; site of an ancient civilization that flourished from 2600 to 30 BC
Theban - an Egyptian inhabitant of ancient Thebes
2.Thebes - an ancient Greek city in Boeotia destroyed by Alexander the Great in 336 BC
Boeotia - a district of ancient Greece to the northwest of Athens
Theban - a Greek inhabitant of ancient Thebes
Translations

Thebes

[θiːbz] NTebas f

Thebes

[θiːbz] nsgTebe f
References in classic literature ?
But the entire range of heroic legend was open to these poets, and other clusters of epics grew up dealing particularly with the famous story of Thebes, while others dealt with the beginnings of the world and the wars of heaven.
The story was thence carried down to the end of the expedition under Polyneices, Adrastus and Amphiarus against Thebes.
This man was very fond of Diocles, a victor in the Olympic games, and when he left his country from a disgust at an improper passion which his mother Alithoe had entertained for him, and settled at Thebes, Philolaus followed him, where they both died, and where they still show their tombs placed in view of each other, but so disposed, that one of them looks towards Corinth, the other does not; the reason they give for this is, that Diodes, from his detestation of his mother's passion, would have his tomb so placed that no one could see Corinth from it; but Philolaus chose that it might be seen from his: and this was the cause of their living at Thebes.
The Spartans held Athens and Thebes, establishing there an oligarchy, nevertheless they lost them.
These founded Thebes with its seven gates, and built a wall all round it; for strong though they were they could not hold Thebes till they had walled it.
He married her after having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the whole story to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grief for the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the house of the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and the avenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother--to his ruing bitterly thereafter.
In Greek legend, which king of Thebes married his mother and killed his father?
The National Theatre of Northern Greece presents the political tragedy by Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes on Wednesday and Thursday at Curium Ancient Theatre, Limassol.
The jars belong to Ipi, vizier and overseer of Thebes and member of the elite during the reign of Amenemhat I of the early Twelfth Dynasty.
The discovery was made in the courtyard at the entrance of a tomb on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor, which was called Thebes at the time the funerary garden is from.
Ancient Thebes located in Luxor, Upper Egypt used to be the capital of Ancient Egyptians during the reign of the Middle and New Kingdom.
The following part of this paper will examine the functional domains of selected visual-pragmatic markers in BL Royal MS 18 D II, containing Lydgate's Troy Book and Siege of Thebes as an aid in a better understanding of the mechanics of the visual text (cf.