Beza

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Beza

(French bəza)
n
(Biography) See de Bèze
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Morality After Calvin: Theodore Beza's Christian Censor and Reformed Ethics
Others, such as Calvin's successor Theodore Beza, the author of the Dutch national anthem Het Wilhelmus, and Scottish Presbyterian Samuel Rutherford were confronting monarchs who savagely opposed the Reformation, and found in the stories a subversive text latent with revolutionary possibilities.
(39) Most importantly, nineteenth-century reissues of Beza's translation--the probable direct source of provehito in altum--bore prefaces with comments such as: "among the learned men who flourished at the era of the Reformation, Theodore Beza held so distinguished a place ..." and "[Beza's translation] was received with a favor which with Protestant Christians it has never lost." (40) Tremellius's Bible, another source of Beza's NT, was itself considered quite Protestant around 1900.
The topics include Philip Melanchthon and Wittenberg's reform of the theological curriculum, Theodore Beza and the reorientation of early reformed historiography, the Danzig Academy Gymnasium in 17th-century Poland, Voetius on the subject and formal act of happiness, the soteriological debate between George Kendall and Richard Baxter, and the Bristol Academy and the education of ministers in 18th-century England, 1758-91.
is a master of the theologies of Calvin and his heirs, including Theodore Beza, Peter Martyr Vermigli, Jerome Zanchi, and Amandus Polanus.
He was Uchimura's brightest disciple, like Martin Luther's Philipp Melanchthon or John Calvin's Theodore Beza. And to tell the truth, it would not be possible to say that Tsukamoto's theory was in fashion among the mukyOkai group in about 1930.
Of perhaps greatest value is his thorough examination of a large body of writings that ordinarily have been ignored by scholars in favor of a nearly exclusive concentration on a few of the more famous Monarchomaque texts by authors such as Francois Hotman, Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, Theodore Beza, and George Buchanan.
Members of the respective editorial teams discuss the critical editions, currently underway, of the letters of Martin Bucer, the principal Strasbourg reformer, as well as Heinrich Bullinger and Theodore Beza, who followed Zwingli and Calvin as the heads of the churches of Zurich and Geneva.
The most erudite rejection of Erasmus's evaluation is by Theodore Beza, the later successor to Calvin as the leader of the Genevan Reformation.
He speaks of the continuing popularity of the Geneva version, though in fact it was the Genevan/Tomson that won popular approval; apart from deep-dyed Puritans, few people were reading the Old Testament, and vastly preferred Tomson's New Testament, with marginal notes translated from Theodore Beza. Many people had copies of Tomson's New Testament separately bound.
It is true that he makes occasional references to various Roman Catholic schools of theology, and there are scattered acknowledgements of Reformed doctrines of election other than Theodore Beza's in the passages dealing with divines such as Heinrich Bullinger.
The Geneva version, one of the most important in the history of the English Bible, was the first to be printed in roman type instead of black letter, the first in which the chapters are divided into verses (taken from Robert Stephan's Greek - Latin Testament of 1537), and the first in which italics are used for explanatory and connective words and phrases (taken from Theodore Beza's New Testament of 1556).