Theodore I


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Theodore I

(ˈθiːədɔː)
n
(Biography) called Lascaris. ?1175–1222, Byzantine ruler, who founded a Byzantine state in exile at Nicaea after Constantinople fell to the Crusaders (1204)
References in periodicals archive ?
A modern port, the Port Theodore The modernization of the Port Theodore is greater damage to the banks and companies avoid damage to the adjacent (to ensure safety).
I conclude by stressing the need to judge whether Theodore is orthodox or not, in light of what he wrote about the unity of Christ's natures and not to prejudge him because of his condemnation by the Second Council of Constantinople in 553.
Theodore is pointing out that even at night when the sun is not seen, it still exists: "For like the light of the sun when it sets, it may not seem to be existing for those not seeing it.
But as the following passage reveals, Theodore is relating how Christ's human "ego" acts in relationship to his common "ego":
Rich Dallow, broker/owner of Theodore's firm, said Theodore is humble.
One of the things that Theodore is involved with is ASC's plan to build a highly flexible manufacturing facility for low-volume cars.
Although Theodore is a historical figure, very little is known about him - which is one reason 48-year-old Chris decided to write a novel rather than a biography.
"Theodore is mentioned in various histories of the time, such as the Venerable Bede's history of the church and in the lives of various other saints who lived at the same time, so I was able to piece together what he did when he was Archbishop of Canterbury.
A third and crucial point necessary for understanding Theodore is his unwavering conviction that God's transcendence can in no way be compromised.
Because there are two complete real natures in Christ, Theodore is forced to speak of the two natures (or their equivalents, the Word and the "man") as two sources of activity of the will--which is then interpreted as being indicative of two sources of unity and therefore of two real "persons" and thus as heretical by his Orthodox and Catholic adversaries.