group theory

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group theory

n.
The branch of mathematics concerned with groups and the description of their properties.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

group′ the`ory


n.
the branch of mathematics that deals with the structure of mathematical groups and mappings between them.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.group theory - the branch of mathematics dealing with groups
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
Galois theory - group theory applied to the solution of algebraic equations
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Gruppentheorie
References in periodicals archive ?
Of interest are three of his titles which, I am ashamed to say, I have only read in review on the internet, but which I shall buy on Amazon and read and the dominant and rather bold ideas presented in those books.The first is The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups.
Theory of Groups and Symmetries: Finite Groups, Lie Groups, and Lie Algebras
Blichfeldt, Finite collineation groups, with an introduction to the theory of groups of operators and substitution groups, Univ.
One hypothesis can be traced back to the economist Mancur Olson's 1965 book The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups .
Economist Mancur Olson offered the answer in his 1965 book 'The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups.' He noted that large groups face relatively high costs when attempting to organize for collective action, while small groups will find it easier to do so.
[5] Rotman J, An Introduction to The Theory of Groups, Springer Verlage.
1971 [1965], The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups (rev.
This slim text is a reprinted version of Paul Alexandroff's 1959 edition of An Introduction to the Theory of Groups. It is organized into eight chapters.