cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

n
(Psychology) psychol an uncomfortable mental state resulting from conflicting cognitions; usually resolved by changing some of the cognitions

cog′nitive dis′sonance


n.
anxiety that results from simultaneously holding contradictory or incompatible attitudes, beliefs, or the like, as when one likes a person but disapproves of one of his or her habits.
Translations
kognitive Dissonanz
References in periodicals archive ?
The theory of cognitive dissonance: The evolution and vicissitudes of an idea.
The theory of cognitive dissonance provides a basis for asking dissonance questions to elicit engagement (Festinger, 1957).
(10.) LEON FESTINGER, A THEORY OF COGNITIVE DISSONANCE 2-4 (1957); LEON FESTINGER ET AL., WHEN PROPHECY FAILS: A SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF A MODERN GROUP THAT PREDICTED THE DESTRUCTION OF THE WORLD (1957) [hereinafter Prophecy], See also Leon Festinger & James M.
Research studies about hazing from the modern upper-class boarding schools of England to the gangs in the slums of South Africa were instrumental in creating the theory of cognitive dissonance first proposed by American social psychologist Leon Festinger.
According to the theory of cognitive dissonance proposed by Festinger (1962), people who experience dissonance caused by inconsistent relations among cognitive elements may motivate themselves to reduce the inconsistency or to avoid situations that increase the inconsistency.
The theory of cognitive dissonance suggests that individuals strive for cognitive harmony (Festinger, 1957).
According to the theory of cognitive dissonance, an individual is susceptible to experience a state of psychological discomfort when two cognitions (e.g., attitude, belief, behavior) maintain an inconsistent relation.
A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. CA: Stanford University Press.
Leon Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance focuses on how humans strive for internal consistency.
To analyze why we cement our beliefs In the face of contrary facts, psychologist Leon Festinger proposed the theory of cognitive dissonance: people seek consistency in their beliefs and perceptions because it is uncomfortable to have inconsistent ideas.
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