cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

n
(Psychology) psychol an uncomfortable mental state resulting from conflicting cognitions; usually resolved by changing some of the cognitions

cog′nitive dis′sonance


n.
anxiety that results from simultaneously holding contradictory or incompatible attitudes, beliefs, or the like, as when one likes a person but disapproves of one of his or her habits.
Translations
kognitive Dissonanz
References in periodicals archive ?
Research studies about hazing from the modern upper-class boarding schools of England to the gangs in the slums of South Africa were instrumental in creating the theory of cognitive dissonance first proposed by American social psychologist Leon Festinger.
According to the theory of cognitive dissonance proposed by Festinger (1962), people who experience dissonance caused by inconsistent relations among cognitive elements may motivate themselves to reduce the inconsistency or to avoid situations that increase the inconsistency.
This study applied the theory of cognitive dissonance (Festinger, 1957) to identify the relationships between positive and negative perceptions of governmental influence and water conservation, as well as examine how political affiliations connects and influences these perceptions.
Festinger's (1957) theory of cognitive dissonance suggested that individuals seek to maintain consonance (or consistency) among multiple cognitions of beliefs and behaviors, among other things.
According to Spangenberg and his collaborators, the theory of cognitive dissonance would explain the effect of self-prophecies (Spangenberg & Greenwald, 1999; Spangenberg, Sprott, Grohmann, & Smith, 2003; Spangenberg et al.
Leon Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance focuses on how humans strive for internal consistency.
The theory of cognitive dissonance is one of the pivotal theories in social psychology (Harmon-Jones & Mills, 1999).
1957), A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Evanston, Ill: Row Peterson.
According to Festinger's (1957) theory of cognitive dissonance when subjects are induced to indulge in a behavior with little justification, their post- experimental attitudes usually involves cognitive dissonance state of mind.
This co-movement of voting on economic and other issues may come from a desire for party strength, or because individuals strive for consistency across opinions and from opinions to behaviors, as suggested by the psychological theory of cognitive dissonance.
The theory of cognitive dissonance addresses the conditions which motivate individual's dissonance in methods aiming to reduce such dissonance.
1957), A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA.
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