sexual selection

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sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sexual selection

n
(Zoology) an evolutionary process in animals, in which selection by females of males with certain characters, such as large antlers or bright plumage, results in the preservation of these characters in the species

sex′ual selec′tion


n.
the Darwinian theory that the selection of mates is based on attractive features, as coloration or song in birds.
References in periodicals archive ?
That men are assumed to be inherently more competitive and risk-taking than women follows from an old theory of sexual selection in evolutionary psychology.
Anomalies like the peacock's tail led Darwin to propose the theory of sexual selection: some traits evolve because they carry a reproductive advantage.
Joan Roughgarden's re-configuration of the theory of sexual selection provides one significant example (Roughgarden, 2009).
Rather, she was identifying a natural convergence between Darwin's theory of sexual selection and her own views on gender.
The finding adds an unexpected twist to Charles Darwin's theory of sexual selection.
Female choice of mates has been a hotly contested topic since Darwin presented his theory of sexual selection after his theory of natural selection.
Charles Darwin proposes his theory of sexual selection, arguing that members of each sex within a species compete for resources and display traits most valued by mate-seeking members of the opposite sex.
Consideration of Darwin's (1871) theory of sexual selection leads to the generation of a list of predictive characteristics for SSEPs (Miller 1999; Snowdon 2004).
All of this is perfectly consilient with Darwin's theory of sexual selection, and indeed closely related themes can be found in the writings of Coetzee's contemporaries or near contemporaries--Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, V.S.
You take a different approach to Darwinism and specifically to his theory of sexual selection, which you have challenged.
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