Theravada

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Related to Theravadins: Theravada Buddhism, samsara, Buddha

Ther·a·va·da

 (thĕr′ə-vä′də)
n. Buddhism
A conservative branch of Buddhism that adheres to Pali scriptures and the nontheistic ideal of self-purification to nirvana and is dominant in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia.

[Pali theravāda : thera, an elder (from Sanskrit sthaviraḥ, old man, from sthavira-, old, venerable; see stā- in Indo-European roots) + vāda, doctrine (from Sanskrit vādaḥ, statement, doctrine; see wed- in Indo-European roots).]

Theravada

(ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə)
n
(Buddhism) the southern school of Buddhism, the name preferred by Hinayana Buddhists for their doctrines
[from Pali: doctrine of the elders]

Ther•a•va•da

(ˌθɛr əˈvɑ də)

n.
the earlier of the two major schools of Buddhism, still prevalent in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, and Cambodia, emphasizing personal salvation through one's own efforts.
[1875–80; < Pali]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Theravada - one of two great schools of Buddhist doctrine emphasizing personal salvation through your own efforts; a conservative form of Buddhism that adheres to Pali scriptures and the non-theistic ideal of self purification to nirvana; the dominant religion of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand and Laos and Cambodia
Buddhism - the teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth
Hinayana Buddhism, Hinayana - an offensive name for the early conservative Theravada Buddhism; it died out in India but survived in Sri Lanka and was taken from there to other regions of southwestern Asia
References in periodicals archive ?
Of real significance here was the doctrinal notion that the sasana was in decline and would eventually disappear from this world, a belief shared widely by Burmese Theravadins.
sich besonders intensiv um Handschriften aus Thailand und ihre Bedeutung fur die Textkritik des Kanons der Theravadins gekummert hat.
Thus Level 3 for the UK breaks down the number of Buddhists into four different groups (Mahayanists, Theravadins, Lamaists, and Folk-Buddhists), with a broad indication of the source (the total for 2000 being given as 187,000, against the 151,000 measured in the 2001 census).
Realizing that the dual ordination given by the Chinese bhikkhunis might not be accepted by the orthodox Theravadins back in their own homeland, the ten senior monks from Sri Lanka who attended the dual ordination arranged yet another ordination.
2) On the other hand, Aung-Thwin's suggestion that as a paradigmatic example of 'righteous victory' (dhammavijaya), Aniruddha's story won favour among devout Theravadins of many ethnic backgrounds makes sense, and helps explain its popularity not only in Burmese, but in later Tai chronicle traditions.
The basic view of this school of Buddhist scholars was that only the Pali tradition as represented by the Theravadins was the true form of Buddhism and all other forms of Buddhism were distortions or adulterated.
54) Even though "A fortiori, [meditation] is certainly not to be regarded as an instrument for any form of worldly welfare or success,"(55) in the present, lay Theravadins in Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Burma meditate, not to attain nirvana - though this may be construed as their ultimate goal - but because they "feel better for it.
Baggage Buddhists span the full range of schools and national origins, ranging from Theravadins from Cambodia to Mahayanists from Korea to Kalmyck Mongols of the Vajrayana school.
by previous translators like Nanamoli) of ayuhana as "accumulation" is misleading because it has the connotation of a "heaping up" of kamma, which was denied by the Theravadins.
The Pali texts are well preserved by the Theravadins still prevalent in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia.
Also it might be of their concern if the ordination in Bodh Gaya would be considered nanasamvasa (mixed sanghas) by the strict Theravadins back in Sri Lanka.