thermal conductivity

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thermal conductivity

n.
A measure of the ability of a material to allow the flow of heat from its warmer surface through the material to its colder surface, determined as the heat energy transferred per unit of time and per unit of surface area divided by the temperature gradient, which is the temperature difference divided by the distance between the two surfaces (the thickness of the material), expressed in watts per kelvin per meter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thermal conductivity

n
(General Physics) a measure of the ability of a substance to conduct heat, determined by the rate of heat flow normally through an area in the substance divided by the area and by minus the component of the temperature gradient in the direction of flow: measured in watts per metre per kelvin. Symbol: λ or k Sometimes shortened to: conductivity
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References in periodicals archive ?
Says an RTP source, "For example, a heat sink for an LED light can be made from a nylon 66 compound to provide thermal conductivities up to 35 W/mK, whereas the case for a surgical battery that must withstand frequent sterilization requires a PPSU compound to maintain electrical insulating properties and reduce moisture buildup."
As shown in Figure 5(a), the thermal conductivities of these ceramics rapidly decrease as the temperature increases from 25[degrees]C to 800[degrees]C and remain stable at temperature above 1000[degrees]C.
where [[lambda].sub.c], [[lambda].sub.m], and [[lambda].sub.f] are the thermal conductivities of the composite, matrix, and filler respectively, and [[PHI].sub.f] is the volume fraction of filler.
Removing of Vanadium and Zirconium elements form the cast Aluminium leads to improving the electrical and thermal conductivities, in addition to the improvement of measured conductivities [18].
Thompson, "Anomalously increased effective thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing copper nanoparticles," Applied Physics Letters, vol.
After the thermal conductivities of these two parts are determined, the total thermal conductivity of the element or the composite system can be estimated.
Nanofluids containing multiwall carbon nanotubes and their enhanced thermal conductivities. J.
Figure 2 (b) shows the relation between the thermal conductivities under the dry condition and saturated condition (shown in Eq.
(2004) for the thermal conductivity of wood chip panels, the thermal conductivities of mats made from Japanese cedar trees (0.12 g/[cm.sup.3]) and of mats made from larch (0.135 g/[cm.sup.3]) were 0.068 and 0.071 W/m-K, respectively.
Nanofluids were originally investigated for their large effective thermal conductivities which gave elevate to the conception of exploiting nanofluids as heat transfer fluids.
Conventional thermal management materials with thermal conductivities (above 200 W/m x K) and coefficients of thermal expansion (4-8 ppm/K) were summarized by Zweben [1].