thermochromism

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thermochromism

(ˌθɜːməʊˈkrəʊmɪzəm)
n
(Chemistry) a phenomenon in which certain dyes made from liquid crystals change colour reversibly when their temperature is changed
ˈthermochromy n
ˌthermoˈchromic adj
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References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Fri Apr 12 2019] Market Research Reports Search Engine (MRRSE) has recently updated its massive report catalogue by adding a fresh study titled " Thermochromics Materials Market Future Opportunities Recorded for the Period until 2025 ".
Penn Color developed a proprietary pigment masterbatch that reportedly will not cause delamination when using thermochromics or fluorescents in the middle layer.
For Sun Chemical, popular coatings include glitter, metallic, color shift, emboss, thermochromics and phosphorescent, among others.
For thermochromics, activation temperatures range from 0--65[degrees]C.
"Most security systems for packaging are printed solutions, whether they are general purpose such as taggants, encrypted images, holograms, thermochromics or even printed DNA," said Vytas Barsauskas, UVitec's general manager.
“Smart Windows Markets 2012" analyzes and forecasts the market potential for smart window technologies including thermochromics, photochromics, PDLC and SPD.
Speciality inks include metallics, light fast, pearlescents, high abrasion resistance, deep freeze, write on and thermochromics.
Thermochromics are heat-sensitive substances used in printing inks.
With the advent and continuing refinement of low-emissivity coatings and variable transmission methods such as photochromics, electrochromics and thermochromics,(3) the responsive, multi-layered skin has become a key element in environmental control.
As a pioneer with 40 years of experience in thermochromics, LCR Hallcrest is a logical choice for developing this technology, as the company was involved in producing the earlier battery testers.
Special effects achieved through bright printed metallics and thermochromics (color changing inks).