thermal efficiency

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thermal efficiency

n
(General Physics) the ratio of the work done by a heat engine to the energy supplied to it. Compare efficiency
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In this experimental study we investigated the effect produced by three flow fields with serpentine-type channels having different rib to channel width ratios (1, 1.05 and 1.2) on VI/PI electrical curves and on the thermodynamic efficiency of the PEMFC unit cell.
The high performance of this technology - the molten salt reaches higher temperatures than other CSP technologies, which maximises thermodynamic efficiency - allows to manage the solar energy in absence of solar radiation and respond to the grid's demand.
All the fluids are subject to at least a small penalty in thermodynamic efficiency (except for R-152a).
By way of comparison, the thermodynamic efficiency of conventional series production engines is around 33 to 38 percent.
The increase in electric and hybrid vehicles demands improved test facilities, which can keep pace with the changing requirements for battery range and thermodynamic efficiency," said Chief Executive George Gillespie.
The plant, on average, was less than half worn out, so new plant was valued as, at most, 170 [pounds sterling] per kilowatt, at a time when coal-fired plant (40% thermodynamic efficiency) cost about 900 [pounds sterling] per kilowatt and combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant about 350 [pounds sterling] per kilowatt.
Another important point is the thermodynamic efficiency of the plant which is more than 57 per cent, Vyt added.
Therefore, higher thermodynamic efficiency and lower pollution are obtained.
In addition, R-22's thermodynamic efficiency (COP) is ~6 percent higher than R-410A.