superfluid

(redirected from Thermomechanical effect)
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su·per·flu·id

 (so͞o′pər-flo͞o′ĭd)
n.
A fluid, such as liquid helium, that flows with little or no friction at temperatures close to absolute zero.

su′per·flu·id′i·ty (-flo͞o-ĭd′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

superfluid

(ˌsuːpəˈfluːɪd)
n
(General Physics) physics a fluid in a state characterized by a very low viscosity, high thermal conductivity, high capillarity, etc. The only known example is that of liquid helium at temperatures close to absolute zero
adj
(General Physics) being or relating to a superfluid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

su•per•flu•id

(ˌsu pərˈflu ɪd)
n.
a fluid having frictionless flow, high heat conductivity, and other unusual properties: helium below 2.186 K is the only known example.
[1940–45]
su`per•flu•id′i•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
SuprafluiditätSupraflüssigkeit
References in periodicals archive ?
Shah, "Reflection of thermoelastic wave on the interface of isotropic half-space and tetragonal syngony anisotropic medium of classes 4, 4/m with thermomechanical effect," Chinese Physics B, vol.
Therefore, the effect of gas explosion shock wave and structure is actually a heat-flow-solid coupling process driven by thermomechanical effect [32].
Topics of papers include cyclic stress-strain behavior and thermomechanical effect in metal matrix composites, thermal shock and thermal fatigue in ferroelectric thin film due to pulsed laser heating, a symplectic solution for a plan couple stress problem, and surface electrode problems in piezoelectric materials.