Thessaly

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Thes·sa·ly

 (thĕs′ə-lē)
A region of east-central Greece between the Pindus Mountains and the Aegean Sea. Settled before 1000 bc, it reached the height of its power in the sixth century bc but soon declined because of internal conflicts.

Thes·sa′lian (thĕ-sā′lē-ən, -sāl′yən), Thes′sa·lo′ni·an (-lō′nē-ən) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Thessaly

(ˈθɛsəlɪ)
n
(Placename) a region of E Central Greece, on the Aegean: an extensive fertile plain, edged with mountains. Pop: 609 100 (2001). Area: 14 037 sq km (5418 sq miles). Modern Greek name: Thessalía
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Thes•sa•ly

(ˈθɛs ə li)

n.
a region in E Greece, between the Pindus mountains and the Aegean. 695,654; 5208 sq. mi. (14,490 sq. km).
Thes•sa•li•an (θɛˈseɪ li ən, -ˈseɪl yən) adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thessaly - a fertile plain on the Aegean Sea in east central GreeceThessaly - a fertile plain on the Aegean Sea in east central Greece; Thessaly was a former region of ancient Greece
battle of Cynoscephalae, Cynoscephalae - the battle that ended the second Macedonian War (197 BC); the Romans defeated Philip V who lost his control of Greece
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Cynoscephalae - the fields in Thessaly where in 197 BC the Romans defeated the Macedonians
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Thessaly

[ˈθesəlɪ] NTesalia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
the other is whether there is anything, if we consider either the principles upon which it is founded or the executive part of it, which prevents the form of government that they had proposed to follow from being observed; now it is allowed that in every well-regulated state the members of it should be free from servile labour; but in what manner this shall be effected is not so easy to determine; for the Penestse have very often attacked the Thessalians, and the Helots the Lacedaemonians, for they in a manner continually watch an opportunity for some misfortune befalling them.
ANTIGONE I see a woman Riding upon a colt of Aetna's breed; She wears for headgear a Thessalian hat To shade her from the sun.
For men will love you in other places to which you may go, and not in Athens only; there are friends of mine in Thessaly, if you like to go to them, who will value and protect you, and no Thessalian will give you any trouble.
Lehmann, remarking that the heroines are all Boeotian and Thessalian (while the heroines of the "Catalogues" belong to all parts of the Greek world), believes the author to have been either a Boeotian or Thessalian.
He is a Thessalian Alcibiades, rich and luxurious-- a spoilt child of fortune, and is described as the hereditary friend of the great king.
As when ALCIDES from OEALIA Crown'd With conquest, felt th' envenom'd robe, and tore Through pain up by the roots THESSALIAN Pines, And LICHAS from the top of OETA threw Into th' EUBOIC Sea.
superficial gaze of the Thessalians. Peleus, however, the sole mortal in
that you Thessalians bewitch those you desire, to deprive a man toward
(56) Descartes's manner of characterizing the sophistry of the prevailing philosophical tradition is Socratic in its rhetoric; compare with Socrates' account of Gorgias in the Meno: Gorgias has taught Meno's fellow Thessalians how to offer "bold and grand" answers to any question asked; see Meno, 70b4-c3.
Not surprisingly, in light of both Sparta's betrayal and its rejection of their aid against the Helots, the Athenians left Sparta in a huff, broke off their alliance with Sparta, and allied instead with Argos, Sparta's traditional competitor for hegemony in the Peloponnesus, as well as with the Thessalians in the north (1.102).
(14) This episode was not suited to Heliodoros' purpose since the Thessalians had, in fact, played a treasonous role in leading the Persians against Delphi (Hdt.