beriberi

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Related to Thiamine deficiency: beriberi, Wernicke's encephalopathy

ber·i·ber·i

 (bĕr′ē-bĕr′ē)
n.
A disease caused by a deficiency of thiamine, characterized by neurological symptoms, cardiovascular abnormalities, and edema, and occurring chiefly in individuals whose diet consists largely of polished rice.

[From Sinhalese bæribæri, intensive reduplication of bæri, unable, impossible (in reference to the weakness experienced by beriberi sufferers), from Sanskrit dialectal *abhāriya-, variant of Sanskrit *abhārya-, not to be borne, unbearable : a-, not; see ahimsa + bhārya-, to be borne or supported (from bharati, he carries, brings; see bher- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beriberi

(ˌbɛrɪˈbɛrɪ)
n
(Pathology) a disease, endemic in E and S Asia, caused by dietary deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1). It affects the nerves to the limbs, producing pain, paralysis, and swelling
[C19: from Sinhalese, by reduplication from beri weakness]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ber•i•ber•i

(ˈbɛr iˈbɛr i)

n.
a disease of the peripheral nerves caused by a deficiency of vitamin B1.
[1695–1705; < Sinhalese, reduplication of beri weakness]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ber·i·ber·i

(bĕr′ē-bĕr′ē)
A disease caused by a lack of thiamine in the diet. It causes nerve damage and circulatory problems.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.beriberi - avitaminosis caused by lack of thiamine (vitamin B1)
avitaminosis, hypovitaminosis - any of several diseases caused by deficiency of one or more vitamins
kakke disease - the endemic form of beriberi
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

beriberi

[ˈberɪˌberɪ] Nberiberi m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

beriberi

nBeriberi f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ber·i·ber·i

n. beriberi, tipo de neuritis múltiple causada por deficiencia de vitamina B1 (tiamina).
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

beriberi

n beriberi m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wernicke's encephalopathy is a life-threatening neurologic disorder caused by thiamine deficiency. The disease is rare, catastrophic in onset, and clinically complex1; as in Mr.
If the thiamine deficiency is associated with dyslipidaemia, then improvement in its level may reduce diabetic complications associated with deranged lipid profile.
Symptoms of thiamine deficiency displayed by an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature.
The research team has already conclusively proven that type 2 diabetes patients have a thiamine deficiency.
Harmon reported, had severe complications: One developed severe thiamine deficiency with significant sequelae, and the other, who initially presented with a BMI of 80 and a weight of 630 pounds, died 9 months after surgery due to infectious colitis contracted while undergoing inpatient rehabilitation for osteoarthritis.
The result is electrolyte and fluid imbalances, glucose intolerance, liver dysfunction, and thiamine deficiency.
Furthermore, thiamine deficiency may result in damage to portions of the hypothalamus (perhaps because blood vessels break in that region).
[9] remind us that WE may not be a sign of alcoholism, but may represent thiamine deficiency secondary to persistent vomiting.
Thiamine deficiency in diabetes mellitus and the impact of thiamine replacement on glucose metabolism and vascular disease.
(23) They also showed that when liver cells were made thiamine-deficient, they were susceptible to damage at much lower levels of glycation products than were normal cells, which suggests that avoiding thiamine deficiency might be an important cirrhosis-prevention strategy.
Thiamine deficiency is exacerbated by the administration of intravenous glucose and electrolytes, dietary restriction, and increased postoperative nutritional requirements.
Thiamine deficiency is exacerbated by the administration of intravenous glucose and electrolytes without supplementary thiamine, by dietary restriction, and by increased postoperative nutritional requirements.