Thider

Thid´er


adv.1.Thither.
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And as I rede, ful worthy of degree Thider cam first Prothonolope, The which was, by recorde of wrvting.
Whan Gamelyne segh hem comen he loked overall, And was ware of a pestel stode under the wall; Gamelyn was light and thider gan he lepe, And droof alle his brotheres men right sone on an hepe.
Tho was the maistere outlaw into counseile nome, And tolde howe it was Gamelyn that thider was come.
Arguably Alice Woodward's "Ye Old Blue Boar" (Figure 2), facing the close of Chaucer's poem, is a more serious attempt to "illustrate" the poem-perhaps most especially, Chaucer's lines "Out of the shoppe thider wolde he lepe, / Til that he hadde al the sighte y-seyn, / And daunced wel ...
Of folk that were thider ybrought, & thought dede, & nare nought.
Moreover, Perseveraunce's description is notable for its shift from an external, pictorial view of the castle, with "toures high ful plesaunt" (160), to an internal view in which she proposes the narrator's emotional response to the castle: "yef ye were thider brought ...
The Cook tells of a taverner in Cheap who "whan ther any ridyng was in Chepe, / Out of the shoppe thider wolde he lepe / Til that he had al the sighte yseyn ..." (Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, 1.4377-79).
Not so coincidentally, perhaps, defense also occupies a conspicuous but ambiguous position in the counsel of Chaucer's Prudence, where the opposition of material to moral considerations may favor the moral ones but does so in terms that ironically facilitate worldly readings: if a stranger falls into your company, for example, "enquere thanne as subtilly as thou mayst of his conversacion, and of his lyf before, and feyne thy way; say that thou [wolt] thider as thou wolt nat go;/and if he bereth a spere, hoold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hoold thee on the lift syde" (C, 1294-1338, here 1310-12, lxxx[x.sup.r]; see also 1422, xc[i.sup.r]).
rice men sendon heora dohtor thider [_____ to laeranne] rich men sent their daughters there to teach 'rich men sent their daughters there to be taught' (Bede 3 6.172.16) (Fischer 1991: 157) b.
rice men sendon heora dohtor thider [[PRO.sub.arb] -- rich men sent their daughters there to laeranne] to teach 'rich men sent their daughters there *to teach /to be taught /for them to teach' (Bede 3 6.172.16) (Fischer 1991: 157) b.
His dancing is such a recurrent, characteristic feature of his behavior that it seems a compulsion, like a fever in the blood that will not subside until he has danced it all away: "Out of the shoppe thider wolde he lepe -- / Til that he had al the sighte yseyn, / And daunced wel, he wolde nat come ageyn -- " (4378-80).