fire ant

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fire ant

n.
Any of various ants of the genus Solenopsis that build large mounds and can inflict a painful sting, especially S. invicta, native to South America and naturalized in the southern United States.

fire ant

n
(Animals) any mound-building predatory ant of the genus Solenopsis, of tropical and subtropical America, that can inflict a painful sting

fire′ ant`


n.
any of several omnivorous ants having a burning sting.
[1790–1800]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fire ant - omnivorous ant of tropical and subtropical America that can inflict a painful stingfire ant - omnivorous ant of tropical and subtropical America that can inflict a painful sting
ant, emmet, pismire - social insect living in organized colonies; characteristically the males and fertile queen have wings during breeding season; wingless sterile females are the workers
Translations

fire ant

n hormiga de fuego, tipo de hormiga cuya picadura es muy dolorosa
References in periodicals archive ?
One species we looked at, the thief ant (Solenopsis molesta), had the most powerful antibiotic effect of any species we tested - and until now, no one had even shown that they made use of antimicrobials," study co-author Adrian Smith said in a statement from (https://news.
For example, the slurry containing thief ant compounds showed no bacterial growth at all.
One species we looked at, the thief ant (Solenopsis molesta), had the most powerful antibiotic effect of any species we tested - and until now, no one had even shown that they made use of antimicrobials," says Adrian Smith, co-author of the paper, an assistant research professor of biological sciences at NC State and head of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences' Evolutionary Biology & Behavior Research Lab.
While the lenses on the current version approximate the relatively low resolution achieved by the tiny eye of the thief ant (Solenopsis molesta), the 26,000 lenses of a dragonfly eye should be doable, says study coauthor John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
The larval stages of the thief ant Solenopsis molesta (Say) were first described by Wheeler & Wheeler (1955).