Thirty Years' War

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Related to Thirty Years War: Hundred Years War, Treaty of Westphalia

Thirty Years' War

n.
A series of wars in central Europe beginning in 1618 that stemmed from conflict between Protestants and Catholics and political struggles between the Holy Roman Empire and other powers. It ended with the Peace of Westphalia (1648).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Thirty Years' War

n
(Historical Terms) a major conflict involving principally Austria, Denmark, France, Holland, the German states, Spain, and Sweden, that devastated central Europe, esp large areas of Germany (1618–48). It began as a war between Protestants and Catholics but was gradually transformed into a struggle to determine whether the German emperor could assert more than nominal authority over his princely vassals. The Peace of Westphalia gave the German states their sovereignty and the right of religious toleration and confirmed French ascendancy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Thirty Years' War

1618–48 A central and western European conflict originally fought on Catholic versus Protestant issues but becoming increasingly secularized. France and Sweden both entered on the Protestant side.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thirty Years' War - a series of conflicts (1618-1648) between Protestants and Catholics starting in Germany and spreading until France and Denmark and Sweden were opposing the Holy Roman Empire and SpainThirty Years' War - a series of conflicts (1618-1648) between Protestants and Catholics starting in Germany and spreading until France and Denmark and Sweden were opposing the Holy Roman Empire and Spain
battle of Lutzen, Lutzen - a battle in the Thirty Years' War (1632); Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus defeated the Holy Roman Empire under Wallenstein; Gustavus Adolphus was killed
Battle of Rocroi, Rocroi - a battle in the Thirty Years' War (1643); the French defeated the Spanish invaders
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors argue that both the Thirty Years War in Europe and the conflict in the Middle East consist of a series of separate but interconnected struggles and detail their belief that the 17th century treaty's success was due to its peacemaking techniques and diplomatic lessons -- to include bigger powers, to be innovative, creative, willing to compromise and, finally, to negotiate for as long as it takes until a peace deal is signed.
For many Turks who live in their urban comfort zones in ystanbul, Ankara and yzmir, references to the Thirty Years War might seem distant and unnecessarily pessimistic.
In reality, the Thirty Years War was a struggle for European hegemony between the Bourbon and Habsburg monarchies.
This narrative is part of the rich history of the life and times of Landgravine Amalia Elisabeth of Hesse-Cassel, told very compelling by Tryntje Helfferich in her book The Iron Princess: Amalia Elisabeth and the Thirty Years War. Helfferich tells the remarkable story of how this woman managed to survive the war, rule well, keep and even increase her land holdings, pacify her estates, and play a decisive role in the Peace of Westphalia's legal recognition of the Reformed faith in the empire.
The 20th century's Thirty Years War involved huge civilian and military casualties, destruction of cities, towns, villages, and infrastructure.
A mother of 12 children (eight of whom died), Amalia Elisabeth stepped squarely onto a larger stage when her husband, the regent of Hesse-Cassel, died in the middle of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648).
Much of the source material on news relating to the Thirty Years War is the English newsbooks themselves--what Boys refers to as "internal evidence" (49).
Wilson, The Thirty Years War: Europe's Tragedy (London: Penguin Press, 2009), 9.
After the Thirty Years War, Rind Tribe Defeated the Lashari Tribe, Mir Chakar left Balochistan and settled in the Punjab in 1518.
1648: The Treaty of Westphalia ended the Thirty Years War, recognising France as a Western power.
Dame Veronica Wedgwood concluded her celebrated account of the Thirty Years War, first published in 1938, by claiming it 'solved no problem' and was 'the outstanding example in European history of meaningless conflict.' To those caught in its maw, as well as later generations struggling to understand it, the war seemed an endless succession of horrifying events which ravaged all who became involved and devastated its principal battleground, the Holy Roman Empire.