Thirty Years' War

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Thirty Years' War

n.
A series of wars in central Europe beginning in 1618 that stemmed from conflict between Protestants and Catholics and political struggles between the Holy Roman Empire and other powers. It ended with the Peace of Westphalia (1648).

Thirty Years' War

n
(Historical Terms) a major conflict involving principally Austria, Denmark, France, Holland, the German states, Spain, and Sweden, that devastated central Europe, esp large areas of Germany (1618–48). It began as a war between Protestants and Catholics but was gradually transformed into a struggle to determine whether the German emperor could assert more than nominal authority over his princely vassals. The Peace of Westphalia gave the German states their sovereignty and the right of religious toleration and confirmed French ascendancy

Thirty Years' War

1618–48 A central and western European conflict originally fought on Catholic versus Protestant issues but becoming increasingly secularized. France and Sweden both entered on the Protestant side.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Thirty Years' War - a series of conflicts (1618-1648) between Protestants and Catholics starting in Germany and spreading until France and Denmark and Sweden were opposing the Holy Roman Empire and SpainThirty Years' War - a series of conflicts (1618-1648) between Protestants and Catholics starting in Germany and spreading until France and Denmark and Sweden were opposing the Holy Roman Empire and Spain
battle of Lutzen, Lutzen - a battle in the Thirty Years' War (1632); Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus defeated the Holy Roman Empire under Wallenstein; Gustavus Adolphus was killed
Battle of Rocroi, Rocroi - a battle in the Thirty Years' War (1643); the French defeated the Spanish invaders
References in periodicals archive ?
Historians of medicine present the results of their eight research projects that looked to casebooks and similar serial practice records for information on actual medical practices of physicians from the Thirty-Years War to the late 19th century.
During the Thirty-Years War, the duchy was conquered and then divided between Sweden and Prussia into Eastern Pomerania and Western Pomerania, which was placed under Swedish rule.
When godly living "comes to the maine battail," then a congregational version of the Homeric shame culture must motivate the Christian warriors in their thirty-years war with "the paines, the patience, the difficulties, the hazards, that like so many dreadfull files of pikes and shott stand in guard of vertue, and deny the prize of worthy Actions except they be forced by Combate and Conquest" (Sharland, 157-58).