Thomas Pynchon


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Noun1.Thomas Pynchon - United States writer of pessimistic novels about life in a technologically advanced society (born in 1937)Thomas Pynchon - United States writer of pessimistic novels about life in a technologically advanced society (born in 1937)
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There's an error concerning my piece Pictures of What Happens on Each Page of Thomas Pynchon's Novel Gravity's Rainbow in David Joselit's review of the Whitney Biennial, "Apocalypse Not" [May 2004].
The approach is systematic and focuses on relevant authors: Thomas Pynchon, Richard Powers, Paul Auster, David Markson, Harry Mathews, and others.
Critical reviews, unanimously positive, compare Bolano to such disparate authors as Don de Lillo, Thomas Pynchon, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, and Jose Donoso.
If these books are any indication, the Thomas Pynchon industry seems to be in full swing.
The Maximalist Novel: From Thomas Pynchon's <Gravity's Rainbow/> to Roberto Bola[+ or -]o's </2666/>
He examines such absence in the diary of Columbus' first voyage and William Carlos William's "The Discovery of the Indes," the Popul Vuh and I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and Alvar Nunez Cabeza da Vaca's Account, Leoncio Evita's When the Combes Fought and Jose Marti's "Our America," and Thomas Pynchon's Mason & Dixon and Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Love in the Time of Cholera.
12, David Foster Wallace enjoyed wunderkind status within lit circles, drawing frequent comparisons to Don DeLillo and Thomas Pynchon.
In Zak Smith's Pictures of What Happens on Each Page of Thomas Pynchon's Novel Gravity's Rainbow, 2004, for instance, the archival principle, here indexed to Pynchon's great Ulysses of the '70s, domesticates the artist's obsessive impulse.
Elias is at her best when analyzing individual novels (by a series of so-called First World authors including Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Ishmael Reed, Leslie Marmon Silko, Charles Johnson and Charles Frazier) as illustrations of this paradox.
And, on reflection, that many of the prominent writers of fiction -- called, variously, absurdists, surfictionists, black humorists, and metafictionists before the term postmodernist was coined -- were roughly our contemporaries: John Barth, 1930; Donald Barthelme, 1931; Robert Coover (and Alvin Greenberg, less well known but in some ways more interesting because less programmatic), 1932; Richard Brautigan, 1935; Thomas Pynchon, 1937; Ishmael Reed, 1938.
With this approach he examines experimental novels by Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, Bret Easton Ellis, Ian McEwan, Elliot Perlman, Tom McCarthy, and Jonathan Safran Foer.
The novels that are discussed are John Gardner's October Light, Bret Easton Ellis's American Psycho, Thomas Pynchon's Vineland, Bobbie Ann Mason's In Country, Mark Leyner's Et Tu, Babe, and Don DeLillo's White Noise.